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Full text of "K̲h̲azīna-e Muḥāwarāt: Or, Urdu Idioms"

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KHAZlNA-E MUHAWAEAT 



OB 



URDU IDIOMS. 



OOLLEOTBD AND TBANSLATBD BY 

LiBUT.-CoLONBL D. C. PHILLOTT, Ph.D., F.A.S.B., 

Secretary and Member, Board of Examiners ; Fellow of ike 

Calcutta University ; Author of Hindustani Manual, 

Hindustani Stumbling-Blocks, Hindustani 

Exercises, etc,, etc. 



CALCUTTA : 

PRINTED AT THE BAPTIST fiilSSION PBBSS. 

1912. 

AU rights reserved. 

Price Rs. 2-8. 



tlARPEMTIER 



PhLi'il'j 




PEEFACE. 

The many applications for a book of Urdu 
idioms induced me to undertake this little work. 
It has been compiled from various sources but 
chiefly from the Urdu dictionary Far)^ang-i Asafiyya. 
Idioms that are not fairly common have been omit- 
ted. My thanks are due to Shams" 'l-'Ulama Mu- 
hammad Yusuf Ja'fari, Khan Bahadur, Head Maw- 

lavi of the Board of Examiners, for constant help 
during the preparation of the work for the press. 

To facilitate reference a very full English index 
is appended. 

D. C. P. 
November 1911. 



F 910 



CARPENTIER 



Urdu Idioms. 



OB 



* IL4J kJHa :y^ ^^ ^® disgraced. 
* 4;^ U5^^.ri >r^' *^ disgrace. 

# UjtJ Ax> ^Jk/« ^S[ to be disgraced. 

* I jii If ipyoT * stout black man (lit. a block 

of ebony). 

* Kij^ UbiJuu- y I Uol I'll put matters right with the 

siUy old man (my master, 
father, friend, etc.). 

* Ui K" yt a silly owl. 

* UULj Jl ( y ^ ) t<^ make a fool of. 

♦ liLuJl^ jf to entrap a greenhorn. 
* liU. jh J^ ajL« Lu UuI to look foolish. 

♦ ^^ y^ J^ [ ^ ] ^ ^1 to praise oneself. 

# (jl^ yb Jbt ^ ^T to be beside oneself (from joy 

or anger). 

* UJy JcuT JxJl to guess : cUkal pachchu, adv. ; 

* "^^ pachcku a meaningless word . 

• Ujy y^^i] &|JT ^iT to weep bitterly. 

• * li Jb mJjl^ f U If JIj JT *^ ^®*^^ wisdom (or oome to 
^ \^^^ ^ ' ^ one's senses) by one's mis- 

takes or misdeeds. 



f , 



• '^i ,^^ ^i/i^ *«5U L il 






not to distinguish the good 
from the bad: all alike 
suffer. 

petty thefts of servants. 

she took to her bed through 
grief ; (occurs in old stories). 

neither one thing nor the other. 

even if the world came to an 
end he would not desist. 



; 



^(^ itJ Xj 



to prevaricate, 
to be cute. 



jumour. 



^ •« 



to punish severely, 

to be in temporary office (said 
of one who loses his head at 
temporary elevation). 



* '^ ( M)y^^ ^) *^^ ^=— 'J^ *^ convince in argument (?) 

# K)u) -kxi 5 1 *^ unexpected b ow or misfor- 
^^sf^ ^ tune. 

* UUj i^U t ji«.T *^ cherish a snake in one's 
• V^ ^^r^^ bosom. 

* UJl^ <^^L# jL/o ^^jjLmT ditto. 

« |?j c£jy y2)UM»T ( y A^av« ) a great calamity befell me. 

♦ liyi c-xil ^^^\ ^Ui«T (said on occasion of any disturb- 
ance, great noise, scolding, 
etc., etc.) 

* (3y ^ tii^5 cjUaw] all the difference in the world. 



. 



♦ UlU 4^)U' L J^\ .oU^T ^^ ^^^^ * disturbance or fuss 

^^ Vi/ft^J e;^' about a trifle. 

* ^^U^^ jij*^ vt^Ui^T to make a great noise. 

* ^J^ li/^^ ^ e;^-*^ *^ ^ ^®^ *^^^^ ^^^ towers, etc., 

^ mountains) ; to fly high (of 

balloons, etc.). 

* ^)jf> «-,^l3 4L ^1.6^1 to succeed in a diflScult matter. 

• UO JULp J^ ..jLm^T *^ P®"*^^ *^® «^ (said of a 

^*-^^ ^•' ^ cunnmg or deceitful woman) . 



•• ^ 



# li^ t^A^^ ^^ ^U«T ditto. 

* J^Ji ^^^ Li/^ e^UiJul to squander pounds and save 

" farthings. 

jL b ) GKJ ^ ^U V-/T to work a miracle ; to set 

peaceable people by the ears. 

• y to be made a fool of. 



• liH^ Ct^/ If y I to make a fool of (said only of 
^ people who eat together). 

# Uft^jj *^ 4U| yt JH " (f ^yil to be hungry ; to grumble in 

the belly. 
*^|J^ U(f ^^ ^yfc^l ^ a one-eyed man is a king 

amongst the totally blind. 

* ^^ v-^>*^' to restrain one's tears. 

«• 

* liyt J dji 41, si)ly^l to weep copiously. 

• li]^ J^lf If A^T (said of a skilled thief). 

* UJI5 A^XiJ ^^ A^J to stare impudently in the 

face of. 

* ^ **0 \Sj^ji d^T to feel no sense of shame. 



ttj^T and ) lil/ ^ ttiH<^ I *<> lower in 'he eyes of ; t< 

' bring into contempt. 



# U^St c;^^ <ft/i'* c;^' 

* UJK' ijyl; ^vo c^r^l 



to have ever before the eyes 
(in recollection). 

= are you blind ? — saidironi- 
cally to a clumsy person. 

to become enraged, 
to throw dust in the eyes, 
to keep awake all night, 
never to forget. 

to be a thorn in the side of ; 
to cause envy. 

avoiding the notice of, with- 
out being seen by. 

to turn away the regard from. 

to cut a friend, pretend not to 
see. 

to stare at the ceiling, i.e., to 
be near death. 

not to look one in the face 
(through shame). 

to operate on the eyes ( ^«^ Ar. , 
to operate on the eyes). 

to gaze lovingly at each other, 
or fall in love with each other. 

in a single moment, 
he was very angry. 



* GlflEO ^ L^Mi] he makes him dance (as a pup- 
V ^ V7^^ p^^j . ^Q p^ii ^Y^Q strings. 



# (jjj \A J I to talk rubbish (of the sane or 
^ ^^ mad). 



* Ltojj 2^1j 4L.J ^ ^®^^ ^^^ anything it will 

^ - -^» -^ fetch. 

* vjyt A fyj] — kapfon se hond, 

• UfCJ ^ v-^^ ^ *^T c-Cjl to have an equal regard for, 



to be impartial. 

* ^^ r^ r^ y^ '^l '-^' to return abuse a hundred- 
fold. 
9 

^ d^ y^ yj" ^-^^ ^1 = two parts of a whole ; (said 

of near relatives or even 
friends : hunt is a green 
gram-pea). 

* lyb c^bj v-A^I to be unanimous, with one 

voice. 



• Ul«j C2^J ^ \Z^ii to destroy (buildings, cities) 

utterly. 



• UjJ^< ^^a/4 ^^ tf iisA^I to make a pakka house dust, 

i.e. to waste one's wealth. 

* ^^ ^/^ *H^' to be astonished, to admire. 



* ^^ v-5< '^^ to bear patiently another's 

hard words. 

* liU. Ua^ v::^b to check oneself in a speech, 

i.e. to pull up on some recol- 
lection and keep one's coun- 
sel. 

* liilf ijyL) to interrupt. 
* U^ juii ^_c^ji vs^Ij to ^® approved of ; advice. 



• liyt ijt:*^ i^^ ^^U to make deep impression on 

(of speech, advice, etc.). 

* J^ vi?b ^ ^i*U i^ * moment. 



6 



* \,j^^ ^ eJ!^^ ^^^^ ^^ words (but poor in 

performance). 

* ^1/ ^ tt;^^ treat lightly (but iJfjf ^^^ ^^^^a 

carry off with a laugh). 

to show fervour or zeal too 
laj5e: (karhl is a dish of 
dal, curds, and spices). 

allure by specious promises 
(not fulfilled). 

being surrounded by enemies. 

to be an expert marksman. 

to be hypercritical. 

to put out of memory. 

to prevaricate (but ly' J^ JlJ 
to put off). 

= kapron se hond. 

to hold up to ridicule, or dis- 
grace. 

(said to a hasty visitor). 

very tall (lit, 52 yards high) 

to worship a person; also to 
admit one's inferiority. 

to be an easy task for. 

to become speechless. 

to be surrounded by enemies. 



# ii^j Jib ^JU 
• liUL. Jt, JT or UtL ]l(j 

* V <=^ J^ [ ^ ^^ ] 



( • Uyfc Lj ) UL ^ 
• liyi J^j) u^i ^ ^^ji J ^^^ 



(Kf. father of a young cow), a 
simpleton. 

to disclose another's secrete 
on purpose. 

a poisonous, or dangerous 
person. 



r 

* U jb tU dy}] ^-*o to make a mistake at the out- 

'^^ set ; unlucky. 

* ( Uyt b ) U.f aSl >Aw.^ to begin. 

# ^^.Ao \i fjk} to be a secret enemy. 

* cb fb 14/^ *^ ■ ci*/^ »/^ J^ ^^ *^ heart but righteous in 



to be rendered speechless in 
argument. 



* tiXil^ ...JkU. 



* If ^ ^^r or If 1) terrible ; the devil of a — ; (used 

of good or bad things). 

# 51^ ^ j'^-t ®^^^ ^^ ^^y ^^^® ^^*t doesn't 

heal (from neglect, etc.). 









• ^/^ o^ ^^ 



UUtv 



t^ ^ 






a troublesome friendship. 



said of one who gives muoh 
trouble in sending a person 
here and there (as of a mat- 
ter, by a servant). 

to kiss and say good-bye to 
something admittedly good 
but burdensome. 

to rescue a trifle from a wreck 
(as a langotl from a thief ab- 
sconding with your pro- 
perty). 

= *j'^.> ^^J^ to incite or 

allure by specious promises 
(hharrd incitement). 

to stir up a wasp's nest. 

to frown, 
to frown. 



8 



# ^UjtJ bjj^ 



* v^^ v^^ 



r> kJ sj'y o' 






*uijt[^]^^y.4 



AxiU 



^Jj^ 4 






e^ t^ J^^ 






adv., blindly like a flock o; 
sheep ; (one sheep is pushed 
into a ford, etc., and al 
follow). 

= outwardly miserable like a 
soaked cat, but really mis- 
chievous. 

= inactive like a soaked hen. 

= to cast pearls before swine : 
(6?n, f., lute. 

to spread a groundless ru- 
mour ; also said of an amus- 
ing liar. 

= incongruous (not ridicu- 
lously so) ; used of sights^ 
speeches, etc. 

to be brazenly shameless. 

ditto. 






said of one who boasts of what 
he was, also, generally speak- 
ing, a fool ; (omit the ^ from 
j*j>^j Per. '* I was '* and you 

get (*>J owl, fool). 

* lil^J) Ijj^ to undertake a mission or any 

big business. (Formerly the 
man who volunteered picked 
up the prepared pan leaf as 
a sign). 



to do a thing out of season. 

to be successful. (jBcZ creeper, 
and mandhd its trellis work 
for climbing up). 



•> 



* Gyi c->lf; *^ U to be ready to start. 



9 



^5^ cJo| ^ ^^} ujjlj vJo| to be ready to start. 






^M r^ v:/^ ^JJ^y- o/i^^ 






U 



i;^^ 



)b 



to be fettered, lit. and met. 
ditto, met. 

to include oneself with others 
better. (A potter on a don- 
key joined four horsemen. 
A man met them and asked 
where they were going, 
** Oh,' ' said the potter ** we 
five horsemen are going to 
Delhi"). 

to worry a person ; to put to 
shame (make to sweat from 
shame). 

to be unstable. 

— to frustrate, make vain. 

to keep on cursing (refreshing 
the tongue with water when 
it becomes dry from cursing). 

do. 
to worry a person. 

to take precautionary measures 
ridiculously early = )\ cW? 

fragile. 

said of one who does things 
that recoil on himself, as one 
who — in water gets splash- 
ed; (might be said to one 
talking to low people). 

fig. said of a bad cause or a 
defect. (Taken from water 
soaking into the foot of a 
wall and. causing its down- 
fall). 



10 

* UKJ \^ \ jLf^ JO vide under ^S\, 

* ^r^ ^-T)^ vi'j'v ^^ ^® ^^^^ child. 

* ^^^) J" '— ^^i ^-^J^ ^5^ being too cautious; (blowin 

away the dust in case i 
might conceal a sting in, 
insect). 

* ^y** J^ Hxfj vrjjb to sleep at ease, lit. and met. 

* Gla^ A^AX.)^ jy ^;jU to *laze ' at home; met. 

* ^^.%J^ y^^ y^^ ij$^ to love or worship devotedly on 

account of good qualitieSi 
virtues, 

* 0^; ^^ ^y>) ^jU (of pride). 

* ^^4^ J^ t^ )^ U?^^ ~ *^ have one foot in the 

^^ * grave. 

* tlfl^^ Jy IL to escape. 

* 1^ J^ 5ii{ to reduce to a miserable state 

(of mind, body, etc.). 

r 

* ^l^y^ s^^^^i said of a pitiful sight. 

^ ji^ v^;^V-» ^Ji^i fig. a curse; but ht. to hail. 

* lijKi <i^U> 4*1 i5^ ^.Q get out of a tight place or 

a difficulty. 

lit. to grind (knifes, etc.). 

= hard-hearted. 

ditto. 

said of impossibihties. 

= to rake up old matters. 

to be afraid of a shadow ; also 
= a burnt child dreads cold 
milk. 

to flee at a shadow . 
to be laid up in bed. 



* ^"^y^ 


* ( ^^ Lj ) Jj If ^<^ 


•oVo^^^ 


* ^')3f^jCh^ 




• ^;<i ^ ^''^f. 


• ^i« ^ j^^ji, 


• Ula. uJ^ ^ tJib 



11 






to recover from sickness. 

= to beat to a jelly . {Palethan 
is dry flour sprinkled on 
dough that is too moist). 

to persecute without ceasing, 
to cling to without leaving. 



• LLo V5,5b ,^ J,j ( il^) 



= opposite to a n(mveau riche. 
{Potrd is a rag-mattress 
under infants). 

* ^Ji ^^y j^i said of an unexpected and 

overwhelming calamity, 
a long and weary day. 

long and weary nights. 

to strive at a tedious weary 
task. 

to pass slowly (of time). 

ditto, 
relieve one's mind by revenge 
» ( UJto ^U^ (^ J^.) 

rain curses on a person's head. 
= he has an evil expression. 

= he has a holy ©xprcgsion. 

stand in the breach; also to 
meddle, interfere. 

to evade doing a thing. 

to burst out crying again and 

again, 
to weep bitterly. 






9 9 



■■ even with blind eyes I can't 
endure to see, i.e. to hate 
intensely. 

to eat very little (i.e. exis 
by merely smelling flowers) . 



12 



«j 



i[ 






JO 






lOttf 






••¥ 



«JJ 



#U^au u^l ^Ci-Jii 



::^>T 






not to be able to contain on 
self from joy, 

= (my) belly has become i 
thin as a chapati fro 
hunger. 

to show one's claws. 

one who can keep a secret. 

a blab, a 'sieve.' 

time-server, one who will go t 
any one that feeds him ; als 
used not in a bad sense as :— 

J^^ ^ [IS i5^xj <^j>f 

to satisfy one's hunger, 
said of a very old man. 



# [ijHi ^j^jb ^^j/o <^^j to have the claws concealed. 



L\4 ^^P iL>f ^ 



# UJKi V5;5U 



• {•/if — «*v 



to be hungry ; to be in fear ol 
detection. 

to be very hungry; (kcUd- 
bdzi or qald'^dzl = somer- 
saults, acrobatic feats). 

= a young head on old shoul- 
ders, i.e. his beard or wisdom 
is inside him. 

to show one's claws. 

to be without a supporter (aa 
a father who has lost his 
only son). 



* ^jy ^^^^ i^^' ^^ above). 

.... u to depart, also to show the 
• ^^•^ *<*« back in battle. 



^ 
^ 



* lUJ ^ds^ J^ c;j;J|i 



to sit still, not move (sarcas- 
tic). 



13 






• ^.'i 'r*!^ v,,^^ o9 

* liyt ^bjl vj:^^3 



*UU 



^y^ jir^ 



« l>yt «i a^Xa. ^ i.^«3 Jj 



in quick succession. 

to do anything to please a 
person (even to reach up 
and pluck the suspended 

stars). 

to be dispersed. 

ditto. 

to become stiff (of limbs) from 
sitting, etc., in one attitude. 

to go at full speed. 

to pierce (of an arrow) so that 
half sticks out on each side. 

= to be undone y ruined (of 
people, not places). 

tit for tat. 

to be disclosed (of a secret); 
(i.e. with a clatter like a 
metal dish falling from the 
roof). 

to become frozen to the spot 
from fear, or motionless from 
admiration or astonishment. 

to praise much. 

to boast. 

to become unfortunate, 
ditto. 

to become fortunate. 

a chanced thing, as a lottery. 

to be densely packed or crowd- 
ed (so that there is no room 
for a til seed even). 

of a mystery, simple when 
solved ; as a juggler's trick. 



14 






* (tofe, m. pL , parrots) ^^^ ) 



said of battles ; of bloodshed 

= he was killed by a sword. 

to be in danger. 

= I made him cross the riv^ 
of the sword, i.e. I killed hii 
with my sword. 

to lick the soles of (his) feet 
i.e. humiliate oneself. 

to go mad (lit. to *gathe] 
straws). 

a broken-reed (i.e. a straw 
clutched at by a drowning 
man). 

= to make mountains out of 
mole-hills. 

= j'ff <J«^J' i^^ <l-v- 



to wrangle, quarrel in speech, 
i.e. to change in quarrelUng, 
to the singular from the res- 
pectful plural. 

to be much praised and talked 
of: [^<i, P., m., the rose- 
finch.] 

to be disappointed. 



• Uy yij^yl y ^ Jj jj = to live in an impoverished 

condition. 

lU it^ tj to deceive { ^y >* ). 
Uji X jj ^jkS to disperse. 



* 



#Uyt ^ ^oi to be offended ; {iemar.m. pi., 

expression of face). 

# tiltoj^ ^sS)y^ ^^ frown. 



* V U5iy ^^ *^ ^^^ ' " iaiol'm. 



1 Ttwar may be used in a good sense but not i&war i . 



15 



* '^l ^^ (^ y^^ ) to go bankrupt. 



* ^^ If ^^^y> ^ kSj\j 



= something incongruous ; as 
a good patch on a bad thing 
or vice versa. 



* ( Jy^ JIJ If ) Jll{ JU putting off. 






^ 






= he speaks abominable (Eng- 
lish). 

all alone ; (from the cooing of 
a dove). 

to hunt by means of a screen, 
used fig., as a wolf in sheep's 
clothing. 



to stick to; not to change 
one's *to«' into *m(w' for 
^ anybody. 

* lily) fi, J,. J to weep crocodile's tears. 






^ ^ 






to give a flat refusal, 
to gaze fixedly at. 

to feed on the morsels of— ; 
(said contemptuously). 

= ia^h of (words) ; chaste (of 
words). 

not chaste (of words), 
chaste (of words), 
chaste (of words, idioms). 



Uljl li^J If ^^Ji to ridicule a person. 



• H ^ ^' 



to carry off with a laugh. 

to be squandered or wasted (of 
money only) . 

to use harsh words to. 



16 



::Stm 



* ^ jk^^ v^^J^ ^ ^®^y difficult thing, near 

impossible. 

«U ^ a1 jj ^^ ^'^^ call of hawks and oe 
J c/^ vi/s' ^g^ljj clamorous birds ; ah 

used of a scolding woman. 



* GU; Ai )>^4j ^ ^U 

9 

* 4y^ H"?^^ vj^ 



« UL4JU0 yt J ^(jt ^ sj^ 

9 

or liyb ^ J If ^ 
* tiyb ^> If ^U. 

• ifji iv L Jo. ( ^y ) 

* ^1 tt;^^ it;*^ «)^ 

* i^U v^ v-^^ 



not to be able to contain on< 
self (for joy or anger). 

ditto, but for joy only, 
to be reckless of one's life. 

to be weary of one's life 
duhhar^ adj. = heavy, burden 
some. 

to despair of one's life, 
deadly enemy. 

his life was in danger. 

to be refreshed ; to recover 
from a shock (relief). 

to be submerged (of land) : (jcd 
water ; thai land as opposed 
to water). 

bitter words. 

= to sprinkle salt on a wound. 

to satisfy one's revenge. 

to be on very bad terms with. 



1 A blind man invited to eat hhlr said he didn't know what khlr, 
was. He was told it was white. He said he didn't know what white 
was. He was told it we» like a paddy-bird 's {hctguta) feather. He 
said he didn't know what a hagtda was. The first man then crooked 
his hand and elbow (as EngUsh ohildren do to represent a swcm) 
and said **like that." The blind man said, *' I can't eat crooked hhlr 
like that : it would stick in my throat/' 



17 



• JiU- ^ii JL 

• <^j^ ^Jf> ( cji^ (i ) **!^ 

t 



♦ UU. jio^t 



•.liy^ Kiij s^ (»f v^) 



* ISi 



♦ 4;^ s^^ ^''^ u5^ 



• Uyb l^i ^^ 



use bitter words. 

to die prematurely (young and 
grown up). 

dSl is distributed amongst them 
in shoes (instead of dishes), 
i.e. they are daggers drawn. 

to flatter excessively, humiliate 
oneself, lick a person's boots. 

henpecked. 

under the thumb of (his) wife, 
tit for tat. 

to tell lie after lie. 

to tell great heaps of lies. 

to be very miserly, not to 
wave a hand to drive away 
a dog for fear lest the grains 
of rice sticking to the )}iu^ 
hand should be lost : IjhliGSk 
dirty, of eatables only]. 

to be alienated from (of people, 
things,etc.): [menninduchat- 
gat = I couldn't sleep; 
uchcUna also = to rebound]. 

no longer to feel friendly to- 
wards, to have a changed 
feeling of distaste for a per- 
Bon or thing. 

to shirk. 

to feel weak : (aS^en is the 
sighing of the wind). 

stronger than ji phSka hand, 
q.v. 



J8 

* ^^ US'- ijif* vs^ =^^ «»^ (i/t^ w*^ 
* U^ ^ i^j^ ^_^ ( «m.j*^ ) he endei^ed himself (to me). 

* 4/* v-5^ <^^ *^ ^® * living death. 

• Uiuj »)«l» Jbl» ^ (»>l*. CO* one's coat SMSoording ( 

# liyj bli^ ^ }j^} M- *^ shave fche head, bean 
^ * >^ ♦ moustaches and eyebrows. 

# ti/ ^ji^TjU. to face, go in the presence c 

J- \ifs^ « (intentionally). 

« li Jt jU. .J to come fa|Ce to face with ui 
* : , intentionally, encounter b; 
^ accident. 



* ^^?W *— ^ /?- == Uspjk^ e:.jL*J to curse (o 

men, not of God). 

«>» 

* Uy c^^^Ua^ Lx^ to drawl. 

j^ Jli ^ ( jL b ^ ,Jul go and drown yourself (fron 
vi/S^ v^ .^ ^V r^ - / v-5 jr* shame) in a cfcapni of water 

* ^U. b;^ *-*j«> (only used in the Imperative 

chapnl is an earthenware 
cover for a pot). 

* lilll ^ ij»J^ to make hght of; the fingers 

) tt/^VT^!-* aresnapped(cAtrffct 6a/an5 

to amuse children. 

^\iS Ji ^J^ c^>J^ to do anythiijg in the time of 
^ ^ a snap of the fingers. 

* ^r^ i-TT*^ h^y^ ** to be a morning lamp,*' i.e. 

> very old and therefore near 

death; polite. 

* UO ^ji^y.l^A to be dazzled. 



1.1 



1 But chutkl Una to pinch and met. to make a cutting remark. 



19 



* v/^^- u^J4^ ^^^ blarney. 






»Uy^|yb(^_^) 



•• •• 



* •-»jy-^ tt^^; ^^ 



« UlsLt U 



p^>*^^ 






• US 



« 

/ 



♦ '^^^ e/^ ;W? J^ ^ «=♦{«- 



smart, cunning (in good or bad 
sense). 

= show me your back : depart , 
(a polite way of saying ' get 
out'). 

to do something that hinders 
progress. 

to be very quarrelsome. 

to get drunk on a mere drop, 
i.e. to lose one's head at a 
slight elevation. 

=all his good points cannot be 
described in my small book, 
etc., etc. 

= 1 want to drink chtMus of 
his blood. 

to move, or walk slowly ; crawl, 
of a railway train. 

= small, crabbed and bad 
writing. 

clapping the thighs for joy, 
native fashion; generally 
used facetiously as to boys 
when a master falls sick. 

lit. to forget one's bounds (hke 
a deer), i.e. to lose one's 
elasticity suddenly, to be- 
come stock stilL 

alert. 

sout of the fireplace into 

the fire: {lit out of the 

cooking-plaoe into the 
furnace). 



♦ ^^'jH V^^^ mJ^^ ^ *®®^ ^^^ jealous. 



20 



# U Jbj jj^ y ipU*^ ^ harden one's heart. 



• 
/ 



# lii J K«iliv« r> '^1^ *^ crush a mil9k/ on a person s 

-^-^ ^^ * chest : (said by a jealoas lover 

or wife, etc., of the beloved 
^ ^ or the rival). 

* UT fc3b xjjJ IS' v^>^ = I harassed him, so that he re- 

membered his helpless state 
when he was christened. 



/ 



# UjJ ^j ^-Jl3 ,j|m49^ =a respite at the gallows. 



9 



yjkS yvfsu* oCT^ ( u5^^' ) =he is always ready to put 
j^ J^ ' - ♦ jjjg knife into me. 



9 



« UJh^ l»L K^iiw ^ forget one's tricky ways ; 
-^^ ^ "^ * {chc^kd is the six in dice and 

^n/a the five). 






of the ecstatic state of a Sufi: 
{wajd is a general term for 
ecstacy). 



* ^rfJ i^y**^ *^ pledge oneself , or to support. 

^^ li] ^1^ some diminution or loss (to 
-^ abstract things, as honour). 

^ / .!« f, \ t; < .e ^^ =to criticize badly; also to 
* V ^^ ^- ) ^r kSJ^ "-7^ pick holes in the wording 

without thinking of the 
ideas or object. 

* ^ Ji sJ^"^) "-^ ^® ^^^® ^ ^^ danger. 
• £^ Ji \i \j:>^ja. he is set on disgracing. 



« Ui b -» Jut^ to raise a disturbance; ** kick 
^ '^'<^ up the devil of a dust." 



21 



* mMj^ K J^ a *' stop-tongue"-; said of a 

third person who persists in 
staying and so prevents free 
speech. 

* ^J f^ ^ fi^iiU fi-jJft. to be self-interested only, 

from the proverb ^«^ sjy* 

X ^Z^^y fnanda is a kind of 
thin cake. 



« li^ aIa^U ^j^]^ to lose one's head or senses 

from fear. 



*{UOb)li;/^U.(^^) 



•• -f 









* XL If 



* liyb jJ^ If v^la. 



to be jealous of another's good 
fortune. 

to hurt, make jealous (of 
things, good fortune). 

not to remember, or apprecia- 
tion, etc. 

to wander about aimlessly or 
idly = U)l^ vilL. 

said of a ruin or a deserted 
place. 

= UfjT kJ^ {Phankna is to 
chuck grain or powder into 
the mouth from the palm). 

to cast dust on the head in 
grief, lit. or met. 

to be burnt to ashes. 

:=man (that is made of dust). 

to join the dust, die. 



22 



* Ul'* ^A/c cJ'Ia. =*o be destroyed and also to 
^^^ die. 

* Uljf IfU. to caricature (in words or 

drawings). 



♦ JU. JU 



^^^•^L^^*'^ 



*J Ij^ IcXa. 

* Lmj a t4^ ^ Ij^ 
«• 

#UuJ JU 



* Uf ^j5. jl^i. U.I j{^ 



= very rare, i.e. here and there 
only ; (a mole on the face is 
seldom found). 

is this your maternal aunt's 
house ? (This might' be said 
to someone entering one's 
house without invitation 
and taking a liberty). 

much quilt-driving. 

a wanderer ; gypsy ; snail, etc. 

gross flatterer that humiliates 
himself: (Ma^a testicle). 

ditto, 
to flatter grossly, etc. 
to start a rumour. 
:^ with great difficulty. 
= stop stop, don't say so. 

=he has no concern with 
worldly matters ; also of an 
old man expecting death. 

to just escape death (of a siok 
man or one who has escaped 
from a danger). 

(i.e. ob ^^ ^^j ^ fAa.) speak 

** •• w 

without partiality. 

to snore. 

x=he is now polished : {j^tM 
is vulgar for kharrat lathe). 



^^ tH ^ 



# UiLj UL =to become madly conceited. 



23 



# lUi. u>l*A. vision, story of the past; also 
*^ - -^ * -^ vain imaginings. 

♦ yj ^kV«T v^/i^ flatterer and jackal. 

* \^J^' y^ J^ y^ ~ -^^^5 something useless, 

superfluous. 

* ( ^U^ ^ ) '^^r^ «!r^ C^l) to strive much or painfully ; to 

suffer much. 



^ 
^ 



* h|^ d;^ a strife ending in bloodshed. 
* liyt \,S^i*^ si^yL. expresses great fear. 

* ^y) \:)y^ -sff^i^ in anguish. 

« ^^y^ y^jm y^jf^ to be distracted through hav- 
ing committed a murder; 
said of a murderer who gives 
himself away. 

T^ » s^y^ to lose one's affection or have 
^ no affection. 



# UUj If e>a. of a deadly enemy. 

♦ ^;l^ u^^rf^ 1^ c.>^ " blood," i.e. relationship, and 

hence the ties, or affection of. 

* lyt ^2)^ to be destroyed, murdered, lit.; 

and of abstract things, met. 
also. 

• UU. Jt 4^ J^^ escape one'Q memory. 
• UKi jib ^U^ castles in Spain. 

* \x^ ckij^ to say good-bye to, lit. and 

met. 

♦ lilL«^^JkA. to pray for. 



24 



• lilJf elj ^ /®®^ greatly grieved at s 

^ C death. 

♦ Ul#i ^)J to feel jealous; also to foegreat- 

^ ly grieved at a death. 

* (Juo ^ u^-^ J'** ^^® ^^^ ^® distributed in shoes 

and not in dishes amongst 
them, i.e. they are non bad 
terms. 

* ^j^ 41, ^jj Jij (he is) well-to-do. 

*^ JIf A^aai juc J|j —there's something wrong, 

something in the wind. 

*ji^^^^^J yj^^)^(^j) =they are very intimate 

friends. 

♦ U;i ^ i^::^!^ frustrate a plan (spec, injurious 

plan): also Ht. to set the 
teeth on edge (of sour 
things). 

• lib J ^^_^t ^ji^ Uy^U expresses astonishment, also a 

secret signal ''don't do what 
he says": (with katnS=:to 
grieve). 

* ^Usi/c If ^|j Ail J very needy. 

* li^ «pJ^5*^ ^j Ja^j to interfere in something out- 

j side his province. 

* y^ y- 'J^ lit. to be swept away (by river 

or sea) : met. to be ruined. 

» li^ 4^i) ^ -<=— Vy ly*^ of a pithy concise book : also to 

do what is impossible. 

* ( <-2^ SX* ) ^ J xjaj J offensive in speech. 

* 4^ sJ-^/ J v.::.-^»3 to close, come to a rough and 

tumble. 

* ( U^ ii,Ut li ) UV' J-i to be estranged. 

• Uyb ^0 ^U Jj ^Q be much delighted. 

* '-^^ J*> to lose heart completely. 



26 

* k^je J*3 his heart filled. 

* ^^ *«Axj Jj to feel discouraged. 

^Jii}^{^^j^^y^) not to feel well disposed 

* lit towards. 

* Uyt t^ Jj to be disappointed in a friend ; 
,.,•. . to lose hope. 

• v.A^ jj to feel suspicious of (a hidden 

motive). 

• ( liJfc ) aUi^ti« If Jo to relieve one's feelings (by 

taking some action) ; gen. 

hn^JiH i}^ = relieve one's feelings by 

action against a particular 
^ person. 

* UUi^Ui If Jj ditto ; also =get rid of your 

displeasure towards a person. 

* ^/ *y^ u^ J*^ ^ make oneself liked or 
J appreciated. 

* ^ s:h^ ^ J*3 to hurt a person's feelings : 

also of memory, to trouble 
one : {chutki I. to pinch). 

# UXV U Uilf ^ Jj to be a thorn in the side of; 

cause envy: also feel pain 
in the heart. 

* '^Jy ^ U^ ^ ^®®^ * resentment against, 

harbour a grudge against. 

# ijjLjjJb j^iu ^j to keep silent. 

« IL.S Lotf^ |ft J to humbug, wheedle. 
^ Ut^^yt Ui ^«3 (my) heart dies within me. 
*ji:^ ^ fSi f*^ (a phrase used by beggars). 



-« 



* '^' (j^ ^^ f*^ ^ ^^ greatly worried or 

harassed (by a troublesome 
servant, or wife, etc.). 

* LUU. il>«*> to wear out, confuse (by much 

talking, etc.) = magt^z khana. 



26 



* ty> ^ VS^Um'T '^d 



* ij^ ^^ h^*^ 



* li^vilJ 



** 
/ 






# Uyt) c^l^ v.^ c^l; ^.^ ^j 



#iLj v^i^ vj;j^j 












to be very proud (in good or 
bad sense). 

to reason, talk much. 

times have changed for the 
better, 

ever increasing (i.e. every day 
double and every night four- 
fold). 

to be feverishly happy (lit. 

one's days are all' Id ^ one's 
nights Shab'i Barat. 

tosay either " yes " or " no " ; 
to give a plain answer. 

to, encounter suddenly. 
(a reminder to a youth). 

lit. to tear in strips; met. to 
rend. 

row (of boys) : [dham is the 
noise of a heavy fall: and 
chavkri is the leap of a deer.] 

a sayings I've no home of my 
own ; I'm dependent on an- 
other. 

to become old without learn- 
ing wisdom. 

met anything used to deceive, 
as a priestly appearance, a 
long and saint-like beard, 
etc. ; also used literally. 



<» ^ 



* U^ ^)j 2( jjj ^a curse ; = may your eyes be 

blind. 



* (dida dald) JlxM ]{jjj 



immodest, or rather bold (of 
women). 



* y^^i ^ ^t^i*^ modesty. 



27 



« [ij^ J^|^l<3 to wander miserably or useless- 
\ -J . ' ly , to loaf : = mara mara 

phifTia. 

♦ by jU J^5 {jxJ] ) to agree heartUy to. 

Ki«5 ( I? tka^ ^^ If i<*Mi ) to be well known, much talked 

« UL|^ [ ^ ] ^^^"^r^ v^ «^^ ^o proclaim publicly and fear- 
lessly ; lit. or met. 

* hl^ ^ ^ ^ <=i>^ * drowning man clutches at 

a straw. 

* UJI5 ]ui dofa dalna to ensnare someone in love 

or affection. 

* ^itLi^L, ^ v^ ^U,i short-Uved greatness. 

# UU .6 ^5 fig- *^ ^® (contemp.) ; Ut. t6 be- 
• ^ >^ come a heap. 

UV )jjujt3 ^S- Jy« vj^lli a contettip. expression for 

• ** ^ being pregnant ; * to have 

and her knapsack well-packed ' : 

{(piendhd belly, a contemp- 
• Uf^i liSJjJbJ tuous term). 



-.Jo. ^ (^2^1 »5iJ togo one's own ways; cutone- 

• * " self adrift from the com- 

♦^lAi munity. 

• ( Ui^Ub L| ) (j;U ^J!aj3 to boast. 



.uTj.i^u.,i(;;t^) =aSrTr::jr °°*' 



•wi^^tv**^'-/ 1'^ 



ing (after sickness), 
wait a bit. 



28 






■)V^ ^J { ^ J*^ ^ y^ ) 



while it was still night. 

a long story, specially of lov< 

f OSS about nothing. 

=make mountains out o 
molehills ; aiso to exaggei 
ate, or hiUl ho aher kar 
dikhand» 

= to let a blackguard o£F with 
his life. 

= the blackguard has got 
a fresh lease oi life. 









to make people stand in awe 
of one. 

to stand in awe of, per- 
manently. 

to stand in awe of, tempora- 
rily. 

(of awe on a number). 



to forgive, put out of mind. 

adj. , a parasite, or one who pre- 
tends the same views, etc. , for 
personal gain. 

keeping up, maintaining a 
thing. 



1 Satan will live till the Judgment Day. He will die at the first 
trumpet and arise for judgment at the second. 



29 



Uyb 



• «• 



Ij ^1. Ju v^ ^o know all about a person and 

his defects: *to know the 
length of his foot.' 

in his nature. 






* ^j/'J^^ J; to mix freely (of people or 

things). 

# UU <^ uX«i; ( J^cxL ) to miss fire, lit. ; (mn;aifc, f., 

is the priming powder). 

• Uyb k-Ji»JJ t-^i; to change colour (from fear or 

anger). 

* '^J{ -*i ^-^>^ ^^' ^^ fade, of colours; met. 

used in comparisons = to put 
a person's nose out of joint. 

* liUa. \^) = entrance the audience. 






Uy. «..Xi«< ^^ <-^> 



• iV^ c-'S; c'5; 

* ^ 



to make merry, feast, enjoy, 

etc. 
to become pale from fear. 

the sport was spoiled, gen. 
(dther of small sport-spoil- 
ings, or of terrible calamities 
in the midst of merrymaking). 

to tremble in every hair. 

I offer up hearty prayers for 
Your Honour). 

not to be injured in the least. 

to impersonate (either on the 
stage or for trickery). 

to squander, make ducks and 
drakes of ; also to pour out 
money for a good object. 

* ^y^ji MrA^ *o '«^ hungrily on to food ; 

also to sponge on another 
person. 



30 

# (bisana) ULo - \^jj = ^-H^ Jy» ^^) to court destru 

tion, rush on ruin« 

* UjJb c^j^ ^^j to have goose flesh (from f e 

or on hearing of a terrifc 
event). 

( ZJ^ y^ ^^) ^ ) '■•• s^-y lit. to card him like oottc 

..• -^ =to upraid severely; aL 

* ^^"^^ to blab everywhere (spec, k 

children). 

j^)^) adv., at intervals. 
* l^ Lfc; adj., all that remained. 



^ ^ 



# UKJ \JLr^) (foAa*, m., a Persian wheel) 't( 

set up a wheel ' = to com< 
and go continually (of £ 
beggar, thief, an unwelcome 
guest). 

* ^r^ J^ (Ji? ^ elbow and jostle. 

• liyt JjLj Jj; (^ yy^ ^^) to be abundant. 

♦ 

J 

♦ ULJjj vs^ly retract one's word.s. 

* sS^)"^ ^) abuse. 

* •J^) ^) mentioned by all. 

• uJl^AiM* ^b) =ptit a guard on one's tongue. 
s 

* ( Uyt i..X^ b ) ^ym sj<i) the tongue fails to describe. 

« UuuM y^bj =to keep one's lips sealed, 

p^t a restrain on one's 
tongue. 

• Ua»j^ \J^ a ^!) can't be pronounced, enunciat- 
ed by — , (as the letter e ) . 

♦ UjJb 4sk ^ sj^\ ' =you have two tongue$; at 
'^ V Qj^Q time you say on6 thing, 

at another, another. 



♦ U$v#a^ cJui w ^i to sprinkle salt on a wound; 



;«^ •-^^. f^; 



to afflict the afflicted; or 
remind a person of a grief. 



31 

* iiJ ]J^ 0^) ^ sprin^^le salt on a wound : 

^ y r^ to aflBict the afflicted; or 

remind a person of a grief. 

* *JitS J5 doggerel ; also applied to a bad 

speech, oration. 

» UXitA JJ) ) ^^^ rubbish, gen. 

• liyb jj j^j ( J] ^ ^^^ ) not to be in favour ; opposite 

ofb>3^^^ 

* ^Ji ^^ {ji sM^^) u^ s^M) =to be parched with thirst. 

* li;U J^) ( A ^^jl ) to pass one's word ( = he has 

won my tongue to). 

♦ Ulto ^ vjiUj not to utter a word. 
♦ |lUt \j:^^ ^Lj =8hut up. 



* K j^ (^ ^J^) l^J — ) mere word promises (won't be 

fulfilled). 

* vj: f|< (f 1 c^UiisJ comic, in speech; amusing, 

causing laughter (of a per- 
son or of a look, etc., or 
''Punch"). 

• ULO ^ A^ ^ j^j to sit up all night. 
♦ Uyt^;^lf^j todie. 

* ^ *^^ ^ ^) J (^ curse). 

* ^ 1^ cA*-«T tli^y J j^j =1 talk of chalk you talk of 

cneeK» 

* iXjji ^J = under the thumb of lus wife. 

• liji»3^ c-Cjl ^^M«T ^^^ * kick up a dust,' raise Cain (of 

anger). 

# ^ If ^LJ] ^^) all the difference in the world. 

• UlU ^%5 £. JUjifl JLx»3 to leave no stone unturned, 

e/^> to do out-of-the-way things 
in order to obtain. 
• \iyib )^ ^j sjij to live miserably. 

1 SafiEron eaten or smelt in quantities is supposed to excite in- 
voluntary laughter. 



32 

• Ul^lytj to spit out poison, i.e. saj 

venomous things. 

* luj \^0^y^ 4SL i^ *M to suppress one's wrath. 

* liy ^U ytj to swallow as though poison 

(of unpalatable things). 

* ^y^ )^'ji>) to be put to great expense. 

* f^ J^) under instruction. 

* iy^ji) = W»«abutt; (chutOiia^t. is a 

quail kept for a fighting- 
quail to bully). 

* 4/ >ry -?^3 to upset, cause confusion (of 

many things). 

* b) KjSsc jiy to get another into a scrape. 

* ij^ i^ ^'^—'irt *^^ to make a show of modesty 

(contemp.). 

* ^^) sji^ ^^*i;i *^^ *o t^cp much hidden, gen. 

* 4/ )^')^ *o intrigue. 

* JU If JU* the whole year; also once a 

year. 

« JL» l|JU long years. 

* ^jHji U5*^ v«^^l^ to feel jealous. 
sS Uf Afi^^ v.^U (y^^l UJ ) = lias he smelt a snake that he 



can't wake up (contemp.)? 

^ ^^^ Jt^ii^ ^^ -^ i.^ »; (of sleep only). 

♦ ( UjJ b ) li^ ^iV ^U to heave a deep sigh. 

* ^J5^ ^^yJU to be blown, out of breath. 

i^^j b ) Uli) viJIiU ( If y^^ ) to play the partof, act; dress 

♦ ( U^ ^P «^s- 

* U) lJ^^m contemp., to feign. 



38 




♦ tfS cjt^ Ai ^L. =not the least idea, expecta- 

tion. 

♦ (^ Vy^ k)^^^ AiU( ^ ^) to be possessed by a Jinn. 

sing., the whole, 
pi., one and all. 

to make no distinction be- 
tween. 

♦ Ul^ J ^{j y^ deceive by specious promises. 

* C^ y^ ^^^'' = C'^ Lry^; (of people 

who bring misfortune). 

* yji^M^ uX^ adj., has a delicate touch, a 

light hand (of a doctor/ an 
artist, etc.). 

* 4r* \JtjSUM, *o relieve oneself ojf a duty. 

* UJ ^(jjCuu *o sob. 

♦ lilO lJ *o have a love intrigue with. 
»^ uXfUil «lu. J 'H^.( vT) =youoandomegoodorill8(>-. 

• ^'^ «;li- ««*i-, with a white star on the 

forehead (of horses, cattle) 

»M>* t/^ (^ j/ x;li« ( lf,_j-*$) -to fall into advemty. 

• irV ]/*• ^^ o^<i man of about seventy 

and therefore worn out 

* ^y r^ ditto. 

* ^Ji 4r?4iy^^^ji« =to never leave one for a' 

second (not even for meals) ; 
(aam is flour of parched 



grain). 
6 



34 



o9 






JJ 



« « 



« (JU4JUM 
♦ liyt ff ^^ 



a thin delicate nose : {stUa I 

to destroy utterly. 

= to intrigue; also to fori 
combination against. 

to be confounded and unable 
reply, to be nonplussed- 

to potter about (always ui 
contemptuously) . 

to be turned sixty and to 
rather foolish. 

=:to lose one's wits, 
ditto. 

upbraid, abuse (not filthily). 

to stick to one's opinions ev 
when proved and con vine 
that they are wrong; pi 
headeduess. 



• U^Jf jm to rebel. 






to receive a person cordiall 
welcome. 

willingly. 

the burden has fallen (on me] 
(expresses grief). 

f?ide under cir^ 

to make a great fuss. 

to be a patron to. 

to have one's head tume( 
also to be out of one 
senses. 



35 

* jl^ AX^ )^ j^ with unbrushed hair and dirty 



face (i.e. the face is like a 
shrubbed mountain). 



# U^jtyd^ •M' 



♦ ^ ^J^j^ ^ v-*^U iy «^ I *obe too familiar with. 

« UUtja^ to make (a servant) too fami- 
* liar. 

• ( ^J k ) ^y*> )j^y^ =*o **® crowned with success ; 

-^ "^ (6»Ara IS a veil of tinsel or of 

natural flowers). 

• Ul^ Ifl^J^ liH|^^ =to destroy while caressing ; 

(lit. to stroke the head 
caressingly and eat up the 
brain). 

* UO eJ^T cJo uS^j ^S.^ (said of great anger). 

• lil^ Jt^ jij*^ to risk one's life. 

• liU^ ^^ y^ move the head (for ''yes" or 

* ' no ") : the idea comes from 
a person poasessed by a Jinn, 
wobbling the head and re- 
fusing to speak. 

* 4/>r**' to subdue. 

* Ul^J j^ to weary by much talking, etc. 
♦ \j\x^ jm to argue much with. 

« ^ iSlx^i^ (!^V*^) yoxkt head is itching (for a 

slap): you require some pun- 
ishment. 
<*» 
* U^ Uj^ ^jjS y*» to make one's head a gafi and 

one's feet the wheels, i.e. 
to try energetically. 

• lii UbJlT ^ to slap severely and make scald- 

* '^ headed ; to cuff unmerci- 
fully. 



36 



*uxrj^(^^) 



♦ Ji|»} 



)yij^ 



[iK^ 



X 



« IS^ JAM 



* UUu ^(^ t«v 









^}^jr 



= he won't leave me (of 
nuisance). 

to bend the head as a sign i 
gratitvde or shame, and henc 
to be grateful. 

to bend the head in submii 
sion. 

to be subdued. 

to find fault with, irorry, be 

constantly at. 
= husband. 

at hand ; also at present. 

to chop off the head at a single 
blow. 






to be proud, haughty. 

weary or empty one's brain (by 
teaching a stupid child, etc.)* 

* j»lf 1^ ii)jk^jM a wearisome business. 















the least difference. 

afresh. 

a leader. 

to look fresh and healthy. 

to be proud, to be exalted in 
dignity (in a bad sense) : (in 
Mughal times a Brahminy 
Duck's feather was a sign of 
rank). 

opposite to ^)^)) q. v. 

to go down in price, the sale 
to be slack ; fit. and fig. 

having experienced the ups 
and downs of life. 



37 



• ^L^ji ,^^^ ur^ 












= to try an impossibility ; 
jamdnd = to plant a seed. 

adj., an epithet of a mistress; 
(but aarv-qadd khafd Jumd , to 
stand erect). 

requisites, effects ; also sign s. 

to drink off at one draught. 

(said of a man that sponges 
on his wife's family). 

one that gets on by interest, 
not merit. 

a iQeeting and mean sover- 
eignty = »U^'j \i ^d (^^^. 
(There is a story of e^bihishtt 
who ruled for a day). 

to make oneself famous, make 
others admit one's excel- 
lence. 



« ( ^\mj Ai*u b ) 0[x^ 0tm communication. 

# ^ Am» (y— ) = refused with thanks. 



by UU 



= to smoke away, to waste. 
(Sulfa, and tarn are two 
methods of smoking to- 
bacco); 

* 4/ v-r*^lr^ C?*" worry by great talking : (often 

used in a deprecatory sense). 

bl^ jb ^a, 4SL ^M» to receive a shock (aan f . is a 

buzzing in the ears ; noise of 
escape of steam; sound of 
in-drawing of the breath 
when startled). 

« l)U.T j^ J^tjuw to fall into a state of conster- 

nation. 



♦ y,j^!^yij Jl^ 



= you talk of chalk I talk of 
cheese. 



38 



^ ^ 



* otj lJ^] ^ «s>t> jM =111 ft word. 



^ ^ 



# w>.iti3 ^v> yM Y** 



*lil|ij^l^y ^jy« 



-^ / 



* 4/^ r*^^ 



* s^!^ U^^ 



• UU^yt llili'^ A^^ 

• ^^ yJv yjji vjr- 



to be much in love. 

of anger, longing for retalia- 
tion. 

I keep myself aloof from him 
as far as I can. 

to abuse. 

= rouse sleeping dogs. 
= die in sleep. 

= (his) fate woke up. 

to swell up : (fAam is the trunk 
of a banana tree and is 
metaphorically applied to 
legs only ; kuppd is a leather 
vessel for ghi: moiS kwppa 
ho-jand, to become obese). 

= **to teach your grand- 
mother" (but is always used 
in a deprecatory sense by 
the speaker). 

to draw in the breath when 
feeling cold, or on eating too 
hot a curry. 

a flat refusal. 

to become a skeleton (very 
thin). 

ditto; also of the tongue, 
to become parched. 

said by people to express over- 
work. 

to keep quiet, say nothing: 
lit. to take ginger-snuS. 



39 



• {it^ «)'•> ^ i-y" ^ cherish liberally. 



9 fi 



# e^isy »lJi*" ill-fortunate from tJie first. 
• ^j »Uwu disgraced. 

♦ by *> c^4 L ^ J ^ *>*- orkiad person, i.e. you must 

treat him roughly. 

• V « tT^ ^U ^j^r ,j;5X|a« he was drowned with shame. 

W A^ iiAiU ^l^ ^^ said by an irate servant after 
»^ ^jtr ^^*^ UTT-^ leaving a master; ^ \^ 

* ^^J^ take service where it smts 

me. 

• liU J^ M>f\¥^*J^^ s^i^ cut off one's horns and mix 
,j^ y> V > ^^^ ^^^ calves: of an 

ancient fop; an old man 
playing at youth. 

« iSxM» *J sXxM* of mysticism, etc. ; passed orat 
" * ly from one to another ; said 

by Sufis. 

« liJtj J^^ ^^ to support with resignation, 
' ' patiently. 

« li^ j^ li^ to face a danger bravely. 



♦( Uyb U ) UU yt v--//» ,^ jU to die of joy. 

• ( OUT L> ) liT vj>>*ia lit. (your) illluck has come ; 
^ • ' ^ said to a servant, etc.; « 



# Uyb^y* vj>>«U (^^ ) 



you'll be punished, 
ditto. 



40 



* '^Uj cVjli iS — almost without rival (of al 

straot things). 

•j^4-jx£. uncontrolled; wild; also re 

fractory. 



ou * o ^ 



* j>o ^ ^ emphasis, stress in readinff or 

reporting, etc. 

V' ^ il ^^^ to take like sharbet, i.e. to 

suifer (abuse) meekly. 



*' ■ 



* ilxt 
* ^r^ v^^i y^ib 4£L ^ to sweat from shame. 

* ^/ (jii^ ^'•J ^ rr^ = *^ sink into the ground with 

shame. 

* [ ^ ] ,^^ U Ji adv. , through shame ; compare 

* ( U;U L ) U(0 Jjjji = USi ij., q.v. 

■ -j^ JLi •••'• *^ hesitate whether to do or 
J" lT^ ^ ^ <.^*^ not, be in perplexity. 

* ^j^ ^y^e ^*-i ^"^^ ^®^ ^®^ ^^^^ anger. 

sunset ; compare •■H^ l^<>^La.. 
* ^ rJdL ^^*to. 

♦ U-^^ ii^i^jla ^^*' ^^ ^®^ ^^os® a squib,* to 
"^ tell something startling or 

something mischievous. 

* UV ^^ilA <iitto. 

(Bhoaha) • Ijj^^ AiiJi ditto. 

* ^1;?" jy^ = ^'^ <3> but in a contemp- 
tuous sense ; (as of something 
for which the aspirant is un- 
fit or which is beyopd his 
reach). 






41 












* Li? 



►Jl? 



= a wolf in sheep's clothing. 

(said of something that has 
been kept carefully and turns 
out useless or inappropriate). 

a gossip. 

= a cemetery. 

= the blame is always laid on 
a conspicuous person. 

to boast: (baghdma, lit. to 
season with oil and onions). 

to show off or be peremptory 
before anyone. 

(lit his boasting was shed) = he 
became a pricked bladder. 



*li 



V^ lSj^ / v-5^^^ ^^' ^'^ boasting tasted gritty 
** ' ' to him ; hence = Uj«;a. ^yfcu^ : 

kirkird hond =to be spoilt 
(of enjoyments). 

* ( ^y^ ^^^/i ^i ) ^ji^^ »;l;i-i nt. the binding 1 has come 

undone, etc., i.e. the family 
or society are scattered 
hence also = to be ruined. 

^ v^ • ^^^ *— ^1 {^/^. jiA (expresses peace and justice). 

# *JIa. y^ j^ a name for the cat; Grimalkin. 

* ^ySb jUi ^ jxJtt to be thick, great friends, 

^ espec. after a tijff. 

« (itU) j^ >^jJu to captivate, charm, to make an 
^ ** unfriendly person friendly. 

(The idea is taken from 

^j^ j^t^ confining Jinn in 

bottles). 



6 



1 8hUaxa is the string at each end of a naHve binding. 



42 

« lijtx*^ JCkkJt to be possessed by a devil ; 
* hence to be mad with rage. 

• ^"^jij*" c;'Jajuit ditto. 

« j^t'^ ^'^'^3 ^ \J^=^ notorious. 

* vJ>iT ^ J^^ "the Devil's guts," said of 

anything long and tedious 
(as an exam, paper). 

* sJ(a. ^ sJ-^iA (of a wicked girl or woman). 

^ ii)ySb 4;^j^^ Ji i^ Ji:^ =1 hope the Devil won't 
^ * * hear me and spoil it, etc. 

♦ UJtf ^^ L^ ^^Wyw to surpass even the Devil in 

mischief. 

# 0*»*aa^ ^Jjaxm = a very Devil. 

« UKJ ^L-'Lfi £^ ^ jju to use «A instead of s (as 
• J^ iJ^^ BengaUs do). 

• UjJb &jbS U _)t0 not to be able to taste, as after 

fever. 



• Uyt \^i,^tm v_-^t^(^^!**?- ^< ) to exchange compliments with . 

Main U8 ko jdnta hUn maga/r 
U8 se mujheadhib aaHdmai na^ 
h%n = I know him by sight 
only. 

• Uib^ ^ ^)i^ y^^^l^ to live like a European in high 

life ; gen. contemptuous : 

(>_ Uaj <2t i^l%j ^ly = he 

shows off). 

* 4r v^-^*^^ to domineer. 

k ] ^/^ ^/ *^^ ^ji^ ij^^ ) *^ approve heartily. 

# [ ^ jU Jj5 Uj^ ti vj^l I approve most heartily ; 

s= ^*^). 

* li^ •sLe to approve heartily and also to 

sign. 



43 



• Ut»«ab. i__iL0 






^U^ or ^ISlfi) 

#4/ 



get off scott-free. 

= l>/ lU ^t procrastinate. 

to enjoy a person's society, or 
be intimate with. Taron H 
mhbai is waqt garm Aa», the 
party are enjoying them- 
selves. 

i|Ju« a call to arms too soon, met. 



UL. 



• U^ lA«e UUe 



• 



= to make a clean sweep of. 

(coUoq. Urdu) completely; 
without leaving a trtxce ; (of 
people, money, numbers of 
things; not of a single thing). 

to make peace with, bury the 
hatchet after a quarrel. 

to be clean gone, spent. 

tr.; to tlirow the enemy into 
disorder; {tdapia is tr. and 
intr. : tJfana, tr.,is Punjabi). 

fig., to curse. 

known by sight ; also (his) faoe 
seems familiar. 

=to slap the face; lit. or fig. 

to take form or shape. 

fair without and foul within ; a 
whited sepulchre ; specious; 
(of people or things). 

to be in frreat difficulties; to 
be worried to death by. 

ditto. 






44 






put on the shelf for ever. 
= U^^; oLfc ^JIU, q. V. 
= Uaj GU (^ ^l^. 

with a face hke a plate; of 
Mongolian appearance. 



• Uiy c;^Ajab grapple with a mental diffi- 
culty, tackle. 



« 13 



»i»^ 



*> »;'> 






to pipe loudly (of birds); (of 
animals or human beings) to 
go at full speed : also huH H 
td'nf ka tarrdra bhamS, to 
be loud and fluent in the 
praises of. 

to connive at : = ^/ c^^ (•^. 

to copy, gen. (in good or bad 
sense). 



•f^3' 



* ^jisH j^^ ui*" ^ ^ ^y^ 






vide j^IjJI cui:J. 

= lijA ^i^ ^ i-^j, q.v. : also 

to be in a critical state 
(of illness). 

* ^ jl * Jb^ to be confounded at the 

dashing of one's hopes or 

joy; vide Ljj and *«^^. 

to be faithless in affection or 
loyalty; ^ ^^, adj. 

to repeat parrot-like, 
to be famous. 



to make a commotion. 



^ To0 or fofa, m., H., parrot; tf>^% etc., f. 
* Tutl, m., P., the rose-finch. 



45 



t 

or £- ^y^ji yj'f {'^'i K«ji) 
• J«or)uT ^"t/?- «-M* 



* IjU If J5xi or tibjil If J5ii 



he is very proud. 



to extol to the skies. 
= all the universe, 
to admire greatly. 



to be foolish; = J^ i^)^^ or 

'^ '-^^^ ^"• 
not to know what to do, to be 
bewildered. 

one's wits have gone to graze, 
left one for the time. 

(said of old persons above 

sixty). 

foolish. 

a mine of sense. 

(generally used ironically for 
•'foolish.") 

one who always acts contrary 
to wisdom. 

one's reason can't discover, or 
imagine how — . 

= \:^^ii ^ lU* : (to chase away 
Ja^ with a t5^^). 

^^/ Sr^ ^* (bu* ^sed only 
facetiously). 

= your wisdom curses you, i.e. 
you have none. 



46 

# J AM L. Jfiis pare the nails of your wisdom 

^^^ i.e. come to your senses 

^ stop this folly. 

♦ ^«3 . i ciJUlSi: a wise man's tail ; a term ap 
^ "^ plied to one who pretends oj 

boasts of his wisdom. 

* (i^^«4^ «iUx> (f yftiJ to be near death, or to die. 

• A. 15 • J £. wfrf (®*^^ ^^ ^'^ ^^^ man, or one 
^s- ^ ^t; j^ lingering on in sickness). 

# \iS 43^T ; J J^^ put in practice ; act on. 

* U^ ^] ♦J A^ *o be acted on; also to come 

J- J ljj|.^ force. 

.•i.. .1 ^ said sarcastically to a remiss 

* Ui^ ^i^. [^ 4Ui5 ^jgj^Q^ ^j^^ ^jQ^g3 alter a 

long time (i.e. to-day is not 

the annual ^li so how do 
you come here ?). 

dL I:* ih vii k' vi/. to one who is not seen for a 

* o^ yb dju. B .Xic j^^^ ^.^^ ^\,oyx^ he ought to 

have been visible ; (a reproof ; 
also = all people long to see 

the moon of *7d, i.e. you). 
« A^ J. «^v-» exactly like. 

* ^ , ins). 

« ^ ^i. to disappear clean ; {giuUa 
^^"^ meaningless). 

, . • I { soreness of mind; slight vexa- 
•>^ j}^ tion. 

^ (jX J . K to make a mess of : 
(compare *^yy^ =fool). 

1 In Sa'di occur the words ijj) sz^)kj ^^ ^^m^ \ a Btudent misspell- 

iDg the words asked his tutor the meaning of ^^^ «^, A similar itory is 
told with reference to ^y,y>^ ow>^« 



47 









to drink in gulps with relish. 

to be quite mixed : they are 
devoted to each other; of 
friends, I overs. 

mad with trying to get his 
object; not in very bad 
sense. 



♦ usio 1^ (jcji = selfish. 



# ( lUKi b ) iij\j] ^ 






to suppress one's anger. 

said jokingly to an angiy 
friend ; (steady old boy, 
steady). 

to be mad with anger. 

= (his) anger is always at (his) 
nose, i.e. he easily gets 
angry. 

= t^ ^, q. V. 

the devil of = f^ ^ ( in good or 
bad sense). 

• Uto • Jagjj sj^ ( ^x>« y3 ) to be absorbed in thought. 

« kC Idc &U wrong, too many mistakes. 



♦ If 



^ / 



« (i^ IrJf ^ to solace one's grief by some- 
thing. 

• \jS M)\i \^yc (of the first lispings of a child 

in speech). 



48 



• UU. Jt> l::>JIa. oc to be near death . 

* lijb j^ to be defeated after boastin^^ ; 

the idea is from the noise 
of stammering when non- 
plussed. 



* f^T *^^ to be free from care. 
* u^***^ cheerfulness in want. 

* ^' Ar. = a good thing it is , so much 
the better, well and good. 

* 4^ 4!^* ^^ ^^^ ^*'^*» g^ ^*®^ (^' living 

things, trains, carriages). 

Farrdtd = sound of rushing: ; 

hence rapidity. 

* ^T^J^y^ Uj^-^y to do a thing very secretly; 

mere to firiahton ko bhi hhabar 
nahm ki = I'm quite igno- 
rant of — . 

^ ^y^y = a proud , haughty person (as 

Pharaoh without a kingdom). 

j'*^ y to read, etc., fluently. 
♦ UU.yt lS^» in Behar = to abscond.^ 



* 'fi- \^ *^'-*^^ cause of contention. 

♦ ^J ^ ^^ the bone of contention. 

* Ujt^b ^jO ^ '-::-AjH^ a teacher publicly binds a 

'pagri on his pupil's head on 
his passing his final examin- 
ation in Arabic; hence 
to distinguish for superior 
knowledge. 



1 In Delhi this idiom may have another meaning. 



49 

* Ui oJsi to scheme, intrigue. 

*(from the Qur'an 41) J^} I^^ii *'then flee to God.") 

# (ilo^yt ^ ( \^^j ) to become pale through fear. 

* ^^ uT*"* ^V^ ^ ^® deceived, taken in by a 

3^ir^ or plausible person. 

* Gljj x^ = UUj ^U jit, q.v., prevaricate. 

* ( lij^f ) U Ulij uyii make up stories about an- 

' other. 

• GUtj^^ i^ili =l>lAja.^j ^^U-f to extol to 

the skies. 



* v-Jj^l o^i tawdriness ; specious show. 
• lit- i jy 



:i 



bear away the palm, surpass. 



* if. =8' slight defect, flaw, some- 

"^-^ thing amiss. 

* Ujt lUJI J =to go to hell; die (of infi- 

-^ ^ ^ dels). 



•• 



* VxLc jj;^^U (^n) to get on with a person. 

♦ (i^ i^jo ajJU ( l^ ^^^ ) to worry a person. (The idea 
^ " is from giving a poet a word 

like (3^^-^ or gyo to which 

there are few rhymes). 

#( liji^J I L > \^j^\ c^ j^^ i« ^ J to speak ill of the dead . 

*(Uyt y lifvju ^KjJ ^jtj ^"^j^ ^^ have one foot in the grave ; 

(in the Urdu the idea is 
both feet). 



^ 



60 



* (jT yJUi ^ fi^ T^ (said of one after rising f roj 

* serious illness). 



*Gti.^^^^(<2t.l) 



* ( liL. b ) [^U ^ f^ 

- r 



♦ IKi isil o^'*^ 






• UUyb pi- 



to wish well to one's ow^n ci 
to look after one' s oTvn i 
fish interests (in a bad sens 

to keep pace with ; also 
follow in the footsteps of. 

to go at a walk. 

to kiss the feet of ; also i 
acknowledge the superiorii 
of. 

= to kiss the feet of ; to stic 
to a person. 

to plant the feet firmly. 

condign punishment. 

to wear a garment made oui 
of the Quran, i.e. to take 
oaths excessively or on tri- 
vial occasions ; to profess 
oneself a true person. 

to be sacrificed for, met. ; (but 
U^* ^^by lit. or met.). 

= to be tied to a tyrant (as a 
ox to the slaughterer's peg) 

not enough left to swear b^ 
even, i.e. nothing at all. 

to swear not to do, as y y y1 
y L yT or Ufyk 1 ^i b'f J 

you have sworn not to come 
here. 



1 Ghalib haa used this idiom once aflfirmntively and onoe where the 
meaning may be either negative or affirmative. Delhi and Lucknow are| 
at war on this point. 






51 



• R 



• UaII kj:^^^*mj 



* U 



jH 



vj:^A4i*i 



•« 



• Uj^ l:>a^' 



LiTU 






UjJ u: 



* u%J \j:^j^j>uj 



jrf" 



« J^^ U^ii 



* [jS ^US a^' 

\ M ^ a / y 

^ *• 



« 11^^ Lis 
* [iS (»/b 40^^ 

9 



fortune changed for the worse. 

misfortune changed for the 
better; vide ^j^, y*)^. 

my fortune played me a trick 
when it — (of a particular oc- 
casion ; opp. of ^JJ *JL^^^), 

intr. =^^ «i*^M*J. 
very lucky. 

a lucky devil (applied to an 
undeserving person). 

one's fortune fought for one 
when — (of a particular occa- 
sion). 

mutual swearing, i.e. if you 
swear to do something I'll 
swear to do something 
(either in help or antago- 
nism). 

to finish off a inajx=^^ ^j^ 
ditto. 

= to sum up ; in short. 

to stir up a quarrel. 

death hovers over him. 

to die : also to omit a 
religious duty. 

to make up for an omission in 
prayers by an extra prayer. 

to make up fast days that 
have been broken. 

to settle a dispute : to kill off 
a man who is a nuisance. 

to be finished : {vide note to 
next). 



52 



^ U^ v-y^Ji ^' y^ ^ <-^^ ci^^' *^ ^® ^®^y hungry. 

* ^W^ s^;'^ ( KS b ) ^; turn head over heels on a bar 

or in the air ; to tumble. 

* l-V J^ ,^»^ hiis secret was out (lit. his cop- 
per showed through the tin 
coating). 

( 8dJl\^ji^ ^li (j ) ^^4?) ^]j to write off-hand without pre- 

♦ LLxJ meditation. 

♦ U^i jl jil ^ii' to omit, leave out in writing 

(purposely). 

# ti ^C c\ij ^JIj to commit to writing. 

# LL$ JUi to cut off at one blow. 

• li^^A^i ^ -=li;U ^- or 1>;J^ ^ to strike 

out, cancel. 

* ^;y^ = 'iy /^, q.v. 

* ( 4;^ 'irJ '^ ) '-^'■*'^ '-i^'^^i^* make a great ado. 

* U^^ Lii^^oW'j to bring calamity on, cause a 

tumult like the Resurrec- 
tion. 

♦^IjUi5 v.::^^Ui (^^^.K-u^t ) J = ^^^ great beauty causes 

bewilderment. 

* tij v..::^U; ditto. 

* (Jla:^^ v..::^/«lx>* ditto. 

v-5^. v-5?^ '^ ) v-^ V^"^"^ *^ chatter much ; also to gos- 

• •1 " , . /' , sip evil of others. 




1 *>* is the first word of four Suraa of the Quran. There is a cere- 
mony after death in which they are repeated and food is distributed. 



63 



• t^U^<i»l^ 



vjit^ air*- a*'* »t)>^^^ytf 
* ij^A. yb A^lf 






9 



«=(yl*»j ^^'^^^ q.v. ; also = ar- 
tifices ^3 ^^. 

(said of a person in fear or 
sorrow). 

= a fool ; lit. a wooden owl. 

= to be struck with astonish- 
ment ; but takhta ho-jdnd, 
lit. to be stiff (of the body). 

(lit. to come clean out of a 
room where kalik or lamp- 
black is stored) = to touch 
pitch and not be defiled. 

= it is a difficult matter. 
= an unsubstantial support. 



disappear, i.e. run away. 

= jet-black, lit black, as the 
king-crow. 

very black-complexioned : kch 
luta ( = nigger-black ; a con- 
temp, term). 

to disgrace. 

to disgrace : kcUik, f. = black 
of a lamp, etc., soot. 

to transport. 

a great distance, hundreds of 
miles. 



* ifi^ J^ ^=-V J^ ^^^ ^^ ^^ ^^^ ^^^ whose hairs 

are still black: (eating ra- 
ven's flesh keeps the hair 
black). 



54 



* ^' [ o^ ] C^ *^.^® useful; also to be slain 

in a noble cause. 



*• 









* ^Ji [ ti/*'' ] v)^ ^ overhear. 



to do for one, kill. 

a skrimshanker, shirker of 
duty, [ oJ, C ]Jfy-;>^^(^; 

= (my) ears were deafened: 
(of great noises). 

(said to one who thinks a 
person asked him a question). 

= to poison a person's mind 
against someone. 

= he didn't feel my words 
even to the extent of a lease 
crawling on his ear. 

to ignore the words of. 



there was such a great 
noise that one couldn't hear 
a word spoken into one's 
ear. 



*( U)j JKi U) Uljj UJf L-J. ^(f = 



J * 



to drum out, drive out 
with disgrace. 



SpC^'*— ) c;y^ ^}^, ^^ (y u^) = I won't do it: (reference 

to the method of punish 



(4_^^ 



ment in primary native 
schools). 



* (xx^jSyt^ ^\i ^Q j.g^^j^ attentively. 






♦ UJu. L. fi_j ,,j(^ 



ditto. 



* ^^ ^^ ( 1^ y^) to surpass (in evil deeds). 



55 



V ^^ 

* ^r^ } J'*^ J^ vJ^ v:^*^ 

* ^-*^y^^^ J'«5 J*^ ^^'^ e;^ 

* li^^ J'«5 ^y^ Jt^ J^ 
* 1^4^ y^ ^ ^=^^ y^')) ^^ J^ 

♦( but ^ «Ki ^ J ^$ ^^ ) 



UuUUi^ 



credulous to tale-bearing. 

to prick up one's ears; also 
expresses astonishment. 

to force one to listen. 

to be quite inattentive to. 

ditto, 
ditto. 

ditto. 

lit. not to flap the ears, i.e. 
not to give any heed to. 

to whisper together. 

to be a cause of jealousy to ; 

= to be an eyesore to). 

to become thin (of people, 
animals). 

= to drag upon thorns ; said by 
one who is praised (in affec- 
tion that the unmerited 
praise hurts him). 

* ^y. c=:^^ to plant thorns in another's 

path. 



••I 



# ( UUyt b ) Uo J c2Jb \Jfi 



expresses great thirst. 

to lend a shoulder (to a bier), 
to assist. 

not to know at all. 
= I heard somehow, 
to be altogether changed, 
to quack, lit. and met. 



= <=• ^:; 



J^. 



56 



q. V. 



X •• 



*4^ v-S*"^ ^ '^^v^ ^^.r*^ ^ some times the one wa^ 

"" " * (or thing) and sometime 

the other. 

# ^4jS Aj Aji some time or other. 

•• ^ 

* til^ jH Lw U *o swell (like a leather ghi- 

vessel) ; also to become obese 












;. Ui 



4/ 






to have menses. 

(expresses joy), 
bookworm, lit. and fig. 

one who publishes another's 
work under his own name. 

= book-faced , i .e. oval ; a beau- 
ty. 

lit. how far can he wade into 
the stream ? Expresses con- 
tempt for another's know- 
ledge, ability, etc. 

lit. sometimes to visit the dog 
and sometimes the goat, i.e. 
to idle about (of boys). 

(said of one who talks much). 

= obstinate. 



= to die a dog's death. 
= tokilJ disgracefully. 
= a bastard, 
a smattering of knowledge. 

to be cut up, of a number (in 
battle). 



67 



{kat'hhana) ♦ lii U^i <JU^ a biting dog; also fig. of a 

man. 



* li^ ^JUS to be cut up (in battle). 







* ^,^ 


= a puppet. 



^3^ *-^ ji ( |»^; ^ ) J^ to sprinkle salt on a wound. 

* ( ^H^ c^y ^e ) 

* ( lilft. <JL^ b ) UU^ ^ = to be quite ashamed. 

* vi>t»3 ^ J = imperfect language, poor 

f ^ speech (said deprecatingly by 

a speaker). 

* k^w lacvi unformed handwriting. 

V 

# Jt) ls^i poor-spirited, timid. 

♦ UIb^ l«i tmi = to eat one up, i.e. punish 

.^ severely. 

* ^ i m. pi. and adv., numbers of 

^* ^ children. 

# ( Ulax/« b ) Ij^^ ^^ ^J wrangling of common people. 

: ljl»;^ ( vj:^il J ) to gnash the teeth in anger. 



X * 



* Lwj vj;^ilj^ *'^ grind the teeth in sleep or 
'* ' anger. 

.' ' \ ^ plump-faced Hindu boy: 

* t>^ ^)y^ (kachaun is a cake and Mai 

is common in Hindu names). 

* [iJ]i/ j^3^^ to beat to a jelly : (jfcoc^firwar 

i s a kind of chiinl.) 

* UJlCiy»^ ditto. 

* k^s^i (f A4»$ q»ii*® changed o rquite different. 
* Uibj y»» L. ^ s^^ssi to take poison and die. 



8 



58 

# A^s^ Ai <^acvS something or other. 

* J^H *^ '^^ ^^ — = don't ask me about it; (ex- 
presses excess of pleasure or 
the reverse). 

♦yt) ^^ A^ssi whatever it may be. 

* \^^^ v^?^ * green dupe. 

* <S^ <S^ many children. 

V ' V 

S ilXi jiU. If Jtji (said to a friend paying a long- 

^ deferred visit). 

* U/|J h^ to make a place like Kerbala, 

i.e. deprive it of water (as 
> during a strike of hihishtlsj. 
* ^y^\ i^ ^^ a great blockhead. (Kursi in 

the U.P. is famous for its 
^ fools). 

* ^y^ (4/f^-* v^_s^ *o be accepted (of one's words) 

by great persons. 

* 4/ h\;\ vide li^A ^// ^xi. 

* UidJ vi?^ lit. to turn over in sleep ; also 

met. of Time. 

* UuJ <^jj/^ ditto. 

* ( U jJb Lj ) Uit^ x>* ty)S lit. to be scratching at, i.e. 

digging or searching out. 

* UiXi ^1 yS lit. to come out of the moult 

quite clean; hence met. to 
change for the better. 

* Ujdf (fIjS = to starve. 

* 'j^ ^'j'5^ *^® chattering cold-season. 

* ^*^ by lit. bitter astringent : hard and 

cruel (words). 

* >Jki ]yS = very bitter. 

* ^^'^ uT^}^ \o6k of dislike. 

* ^^' [ ^>i^ ] v-Tj to suffer hardships. 



59 



«**< *ti ^ &^ ^ ^ 



to speak harshly. 

= everybody, high and low. 
= to defy. 

(said of a very fat man). 
= he is of no account. 



= of no use. 



= ^ 



>/C 



,J^^ U^ > Q* V. 



^uS^- 



^ b-> i/ h^ u^. q ▼. 

how shall I have the face to 
say this ? 



how shall I be able to face 
him? 



* Joib ^ whoever he may be. 



9 



>» 
^ 
^ 



* Uyt JXu JJ 



with broad-forehead ; also met. 
of cheerful countenance. 

open-hearted, generous. 

slaughter. 

to struggle together. 

offended. 

to trace or embroider figures 
on cloth. 

a flat bare plain. 

to talk blasphemy. 

overcome the obstinacy of. 

to get out of order ; (of the 
works of a watch, or maohi- 
nery of a human being). 



60 



« IJ^V A»li 



^jJi^ ^ 



# l£jkj 1^ \^jSii (Icalank kd ttka)- 

«^ • •• 

* Ula.yt ^^b ^[j \jsJS 









#UuJ 



fWj ^PJ^ 



xiS 



• • •• 

♦ ^^ c/^ ^^?^ 
* (iyt uxitJ uJjto tsui^ 



lit. to repeat the Muslim cree 
ki&i hd kalima pafhna 
admire and praise a persoi 

co-religionist (of Muslim 
Christians, or Jews ; said < 
the different sects in eac 
religion of each other). 

brand of disgrace, 

= the heart to leap with joy. 

the heart to be upset (o 
hearing sudden bad news). 

to be, or feel, encouraged, 
to sink, of the heart, 
to be wounded in heart, 
expresses fear. 

to harden one's heart. 

to be cut to the quick. 

= to restrain one's sorrow. 

to break, of the heart; to be 
pained in heart at a pathetic 
story. 

to press the heart as a sign 
of grief. 

to satisfy one's heart's longing, 
get ease; also to please 
(one's parents, etc). 

to cause sorrow to.. 

= the words pierced (my) 
heart like arrows. 

ditto. 



ditto. 

to beat, of the heart, nat1]^ 
ally. 

ditto. 



61 






*UJ& 



jii 



♦ by ju 

# ( OKJ U ) U,U U»J 



* aJLmo j»i 



* tkSid If ♦A^ 



to beat suddenly, of the heart. 

(my) heart leapt into (my) 
mouth. 

ditto, 
(expresses jealousy). 

= think how it would be in 
your own case ; put yourself 
in my place. 

to embrace (of children or 
sweethearts, wife; (not for 
friends). 

to get ease, pleasure ; vide 

to do something wonderful or 
strange. 

lit. to catch birds with a long 
limed rod (kampd) ; and met 
to catch anything good. 

gird up the loins for ; get ready 
for. 

girded, ready for. 

to go in the loins; met. to be 
deserted by friends; to lose 
for a support (as a son, friend , 
etc.). 

to rest awhile (during or after 
work); to lie down for a 
Httle. 

= ^y^ and fj»^. 

= manly ^^^^ .y^, and 



undo one's belt, etc., and be at 
ease. 



* ^^4^ Jr4^ ^ to quit service, retire. 



62 



to look sideways at secrel 
to make sheep's-eyes at. 

to eavesdrop. 

* UJI^ iiiS ^o avoid meeting ; slip a^ 

on nearing ; also to avoid 
evade a subject in conver 
tion. 












an uncouth person either 
looks or manners ; also 
blockhead. 

= Uj^ Uj.-k', q.v. 

to dig a pitfall for. 

= to lead a person a' dance. 

to be full of (mischief, etc.). 

= to become a prostitute (li 
sit in an upper storey). 

to become noised abroad, 

to open a big business c 
factorv. 



* U^y \^^y^ a big trader. 



♦ ^Jji- 



^ u^y 









* (iyb Ai 

* ^^ uri^ y;i3 i_ ^-^i 

M 



= not to have had a goo 
education ; (kodon is a chea] 
grain Hke millet). 

thick-headed. 

= to be penniless. 

valueless. 

to become worthless. 

to be sold at three for a kauri 
ditto. 

worthless. 

to be paid in full. 

= keep an account of evert 
farthing ; of a miser. 



63 






= to be in need of even a 
penny. 

to be sold for a song. 

to have suzerainty over. 

(of reciprocal curses), 
ditto. 

to shun much. 

ditto. 

ditto. 

= she has children ; lit. she is 
cool in her flank. * 

* ??r*' v^ *^-^ o-Axuo j^ ^U or U/oU maternal 

^ affection. 

♦ £^j ^^jj ^j^^ 2^iU jL^y a blessing ; = may your hus- 
band and children live and 
make you happy : {bhar% 
means may your mdng be 
full of sendur and your kokh 
full of children ; kokh flank, 
practically means * lap '). 

ditto 



*. 



♦ ^I'i Jii ^ ^y 

• o^ IWS <J^ 



= a galley-slave : one sweated, 
to work Uke a slave. 

to be crushed in an oil press ; a 
form of death punishment: 
met. to sweat another. 

some one or other. 

said of an old man whose hair 
is black. 



I ** To whom is the kingdom to-day ? To God, the One, the Most 
Powerful. " — Quran. 

« Compare ^*^; (^'^M^ ^ v>jU ^q y^Q happy with a living hushand. 

M 

Mang^ f., the parting of the hair, is coloured with sendur by Hindu 
women as a sign of tukdg. 



64 






[to squander sovereigns and] 
to preserve coals; said of 
foolish economy : penny- 



wise. 



n • •* 



S liU If J^ Gl If ^l^ 
♦ ( '$^^ u^> ^^ ^) 



= faulty acts or words; a 
friend bidding good-bye says 
mera kahdsund mu^df kamd. 

talk on both sides: negotia- 
tions; also to pass on in- 
formation mischievously, re- 
peat things. 

= embezzle and give no sign. 
= happy even in his poverty : 
(a proverb). 



= somewhere quite strange. 

to what a distance, far off. 

= 1*11 have no opportunity 
to see you again. 

= come back quickly. (With 
Hindus it is a religious cere- 
mony to drink water imme- 
diately after eating). 

= to eat his food and yet to 
injure another. 

* Jyr^ v^"*V to tell false tales about an- 
other : (but ^h'^ (^1*^ to tell 
tales, the tales may be 
, . . . tr^e). 

* |/^ ^ ^Ui ^[^ a person or an animal that is 

the means of livelihood : also 
a young disciple kept by an 
old prostitute to support 
her. 



♦ UjD Ai ^1 l^ Ll^ 



lit. eating and drinking does 
no good to my body; said 
by one in grief. 



65 






* UUm, 



• lT lu . ,ib 



w 

^j^ 






^ Ul^j *_jji c2^l^ ^y 



• /p. <=M 

9 



ill-feeling between two or more. 

to crowd or pack choke-full (of 
people or things). 

to concoct plans. 

to become grizzled, black and 
white, of the hair. 

= dealings over the counter. 

to sleep on a rough (bare) 
bedstead; said as a reproof 
to one that makes a rude or 
rough speech. 

to speak plainly, without 
mincing one's words. 

= I didn't sit down there 
even for a minute. 

said to a friend that won't 
take a chair. (There was a 
certain Pir, who remained 
standing all his life, and 
now people fast in his name, 
and while doing so stand 
the whole day). 

to get one's clothes back from 
the wash the same day. 

look in for a moment on your 
way to office; I won't even 
detain you by asking you 
to sit down. 

to be free, go about at will 
(in a bad sense). 

openly. 

ditto 

to prevail on, persuade. 

to be interrupted or prevented. 



(56 



•• • ^ ** 

* UIIm. ^cr*^ »^^ 

# by OJ^^ 
# ly ( ^iif) b ) 5i^ Ji«^ 



to beat a person's bead 
a jelly ; {pUpUa : soft a 
flabby, of flesh, soft fruit 

to talk too much. 

= Ut-/ ^«j (^. 

= to dig out information. 



= **^ vlr^ *«f^ Jt^^ or 

« 
to presume on the protectic 

of another. 

to breed horses : {khet is 
horse-breeding district). 

to take place, of a battle ; 1 
be slain, of a number. 

to remain in the field, be slaj 
in battle. 

to rise, of the moon. 

to win a battle. 

to reproach severely. 

to spoil sport, plan, business 

to think a thing a trifle, thin 
light of. 



# A^i A> J^i somewhere or other. 

^ £^ JU UJ = worth nothing. 

S ^ J^^ ^ = I or he, etc., can't. 

^j^U. JJJ A^ Uf vide A ^^ u^. 



67 

S ^liuwl^ US lit. what connection, what 

business have I with ; also 
colloquially = not at all ; no 
connection, etc. 

* U^^mJl^^ x^ J?H^ ^ ^*11 i^^^ ^ difficulty. 

# ]jy^ \uS large scrawl, bad writing: (lit. 

insect-kind). 

: Up fi_ yj.r ( o^ ^^^) ^ to be eaten by worms ; a 

*^5J^^— 5^ vJ^^> SA^ - r (such an expression is used of 
S KjJU 4J jbJi jCwjI aS -jjt> J things as well as of people). 




* ^y^j^^ = rubbish. 

* ^^^ u5^ ,r^4^»^ y y^j^ = he was walking along conten- 

tedly, but seeing a carriage 
said, I must get into it as 
my feet are sore ; said of one 
who becomes lazy on seeing 
^ unaccustomed comforts. 

♦ ^^^ Jf = to sulk. 

* { ^y^ \^^ k ) 'ry^ f^^ reciprocal (filthy) abuse. 

* Uif J|f f., reciprocal abuse. 

• UjLa. A^lf to tie the nuptial knot (said 
y of the parents). 

* byi ^ ^^^ ~ wealthy. 

# dt*-sjj t AjjJf ^^®'3 own money; = apnepaUe 

* ^ *^ ^^ «y dL^Iiir leaving an empty purse. 

*i .J 5ir adj., tapering. 

# U»it j,^ 'If *^ ^® finished, done with; 
J^ jjr^ ^ made away with. 

# lU .^; J If show violence. 

# LLS ^...^ 5lf to eat up, generally met 



1 <*i5>T«^ conical. 



68 



# £J^ i^K = c^ (^ ^^ 






• U^it l^i? ^^ 






* V ^^? ^^^ ( o*^ ^ ) 

* UU.yt j/ (^ JjU/o £.— ) 

*(f • V-5**^ •^ *^^) ^- ^ •?/ 

* gT ^^ lA^/ ( ^j^ ) 



gossiping together; (not in 
bad sense). 

to gossip (contemp. term). 

silent ; secret. 

to be entwined (of wrestlers), 
f., a confused crowd. 

to heap up in a mass anyhow. 

to be very friendly. 

lit. tickling : fig. to have an 
itching or longing to do a 
thing. 

to hold up to ridicule. 

to educate a fool. 

to demolish (a fort, city, etc.). 

life being burdensome. 

= UXJ \jj, to be unpleasant 
or burdensome. 

ditto. 

lit. a poor puss ; fig. a sly and 
wicked rogue. 

to be worthless compared to — . 
a gad-about, vagrant. 

= suffered misfortune. 

= mv luck took a bad turn. 

to raise the head, rebel. 

to tyrannize over ; to stick 
to and dun, etc. 



69 



• (W^ ^j ^> ^' 



to be fickle as a chameleon. 



intimacy. 

briskness in trade, 
ardour. 

(= everybody is talking of it). 

to experience the ups and 
downs of life. 






ditto. 



condiments. 



^j 



hot and hot, piping hot. 

to satisfy anger ; also to satis- 
fy lust. 






* J'^M^ ^ a gpi^ril with beDs round his 

neck, i.e. a cunning rogue. 

a difficulty to arise, a dissen- 
sion to take place. 

= to lose from one's own 
pocket. 

not to feel kindly disposed to ; 
to rankle. 



• lit^J ^y to tumble in flight (of pigeons). 

A^Sljt ^ji^ Ki)^^ ^) ^-^ ^hi/ to seize by the collar, arrest ; 

used lit. and fig. ; also to 



* (0/15 



make a olaim against, 
ditto. 



* '•^^•^ ^"^ uf^ ^^^i^ (expresses shame). 
# liJ|5 aJu« a/« \J^^ ditto. 

* Ht^ y*^ ^ avoid, evade. 



70 



P 9 



* li^ ixfty ^ ut^^ ^^ y ^^ strain at a gnat, etc. 



# Ujl^l 4S^J^^ 4;-.jf 



* til;! ^^^ jr 



to talk ill of the dead ; also to 
raise up an old or forgotten 
quarrel. 

= let bygones be bygones. 

to blossom ; fig. = a wonderful 
thing has happened. 

= to live in a bed of roses, 
live luxuriously. 



extinguish a lamp. 
* t>yt> ^S to be extinguished, of a lamp, 
to be cauterized. 
= ^^y%^, J^, q.v. 






. ( Uj. b ) U^ XT 



to lose one's voice, become 
hoarse. 

to shout at the top of one's 
voice. 

a light pleasant cold, before or 
after the intense cold. 

to force a person to accept a 
thing. 

to stick to a person, 
to embrace. 

to cherish anjiihing carefully ; 
hal— 

to be an encumbrance. 

sticking to a person ; impor- 
tuning. 

to be angry; (of the veins of 
the neck swelling in anger). 



71 

* liKJ ^ to take into one's embrace 

affectionately. 

* UU c^ ir = U/U ^, q.v. 

# liL* }S to embrace, of friends. 

9 9 

* litx«Jt; ^^ S to keep silent. 

* J^ J anonymous* 

# lilf ^ to sing the praises of; show 

one's gratitude. 

* ^^ [*/ *o ^® grateful. 

* ( ^^^^ ^ ) ^y^ ftvi? wheat-coloured, i.e. tawny, 

rather dark (of Indians). 

9 

• ^jJ y^ Ui ^jX? said of those who expose good 

articles for sale in the win- 
dows, etc., but sell bad ones. 

9 

* 4^^ ^^ ^^ ^^^^ round (as a snake). 

* ^ j]tyi3iS lit. striped; also fig. every 

other day or time. 

* y^-*^ 1^ a mixture of white and yellow, 

as silver and gold brocade ; 
also of utensils half brass and 
half copper. 

# M^s - j3* X^ / / ^ wftlk slowly and mincingly. 

* bj Jy Ui iyi, IS counted bits of meat and 

t , - 1^\ ^"^ measured soup, i.e. food 

{g%n% bott) g^i^giiy ^^^^ ^^^ 

.., .^ ^ an image of Ganesh in cow 

* ^^^- >V dung; a fat lubberly person ) 

a slovenly and incompetent 
worker. 

* £^j ^^ j^ = Uaj ^^^J ^^^, q.v. 

• UxJ >/• ji^ to adopt a child. 

I OandS is an upright stripe, but dhari is a transverse stripe. 



72 



• ( liHi^ b ) UK^^ 



to be near death , but to esci 
it. 

to put a man's life in dangei 
funeral ceremonies. 

said by the aged = I am \ 
the brink of my grave. 

to treat a person's words as 
no importance. 

to strike the ear, be heard, 
take heed to. listen to. 
to inform a person. 

vaguely, ambiguously. 

* ^S fj^ i\4 ^oise and confusion ; jumble 

mess. 

s 

* (JyH ^ yy ^^' ^^^' flower of the wild-fij 

(which has no flower) ; ^g. = 

*^>^ ^^ rare, not to b< 
found. 

= damn it. 









#Ul«J|^^w l^y* (f »/ 



a selfish or interested friend. 
{gaun — mcUlah). 

(said to one who refuses to 
speak in approval or disap- 
proval). 

= nothing (contemptuous); he 
thinks nothing of me, etc. ; (a 
fowl's excrement is the worst 
of all). 

to do the humblest act (said of 
one very obedient) ; not con- 
temptuous. 



1 Oti^e ha gur, na khatta na mltha — Pro v. If a mute be asked 
whether gur is sweet or sour, he won't reply. 



73 









. uu. ^L <? <i,ur til/ 









• lir^y 4 



V^ 



to make dirty, spoil. 

to eat dirt, to repent: 711am 
ne guh khdyd ki aiad ham kiyd 
= I did very wrong in doing 
so. 

to keep a thing very secret ; 
said of a person needlessly 
reserved. 

to become dirty , spoiled. 

(= ^3t \j^ ot#? il (j^->, which 

latter, however, is not the 
idiom). 

(said of a traveller who has 
gained experience). 

to smuggle. 

to become stupid (like a 
bullock or goat). 

= ^ ^fe", q.v. 
= IJIL %{, ST. q.v. 

to keep tied to one's apron- 
strings; (said of an unmarried 
girl by her mother when she 
is old enough to be married). 

= to be something to which one 
has been used since infancy, 
to be second nature. (Qhu^ 
is an opening medicine given 
to a newly-born infant). 

= adv., at one's ease. 

to enjoy oneself watching one's 
own ruin. (Nero fiddling 
while Rome burnt). 

to turn out of house and home ; 
lit. and fig. 



♦ JU.) ^ j4 light of the house, i.e. a son. 



10 



74 



*[J^5liiJ] ^jjj^ try 



• ^Ji ^^H oii4 ( ii-.'l ) 

* ULa. J/« J«f 



a treacherous confidant [demo- 
lisber of Ceylon I ; an allu- 
sion to Bawan's confidant 
who betrayed him to Ram. 

= this house oppresses one by 
its loneliness now that So 
and so has gone. 

= ^Uf l^y^ q.v. 

= to tell to go home, i.e. to 
turn anyone away disap- 
pointed. 

ditto. 

to build a house; establish a 
family; take a wife; take 
up an abode ; lit. or fig. 

m., a wife. 

to take as mistress. 

master of the house, husband. 

(the mistress) wife. 

to be intimate friends. 

to sleep soundly ; also to die. 

he waiS put to much shame. 

changeable or fickle ; also of 
one always ailing from some- 
thing. 

to be at the point of death, 
adj. pushing (of a person). 

to sob after weeping. 

to be commingled, lit. and 
met. 



75 



w- ' lit. wheel on which utensils are 

* jh^ \J^^ polished ; fig. one that gads 

about, and hence flighty, 

silly. 
* 11^ sy4.l4 ^^^ cloudy. 

*^^ S ^ 4^')^ to sleep free of anxiety (Uke a 
r- r ^' ^^ ^jealer who has sold his 

horses). 

• Uil^f ^^y^ m. , mutual fisticuffs. 

« Ulrw il,^ L. cJ to show joy or gratitude at 

* C^" " being successful ; (a lamp of 

gh% is ignited after obtaining 
one's desire). 

# cyb c;V? M finished and done with, past 

• - ^-^ ^. and gone (of a man) ; lit. or 

* !;/ ^^ fig. 

* liUj j:x/i iJj/ to bluster, to show bullying 
Srr^" ** bluster. 

^ gcdi Mar^i. ^sJ a stupid ass. 

* \J^,.^M K^^^ *^ ^^^^ round; vide ^J^^> 

A i., e . -.1 / . 1^ the weevil gets ground with 

• ^^V uri tt/«s *«^^ ^ ^^tri^ the wheat ; (i.e. no distinction 



J 



being made between good 
and bad). 

# JbT > lit. Ar., *' I don't care"; in 
- * Urdu used as an adj. = care- 

less ; e^ J^^ ^ subs. 
•li?W J^^ =to curse. 

# S^ c-^ / jL* is^J (said of a woman who is sound 

• \^r^ ^J^r ^ and hale after giving birth 

to a child). 

« U>;U c^J to kick ; also to spurn. 



76 



* 






* Ur*^ v^«^' (of reciprocal lathi play). 
*^-^P>T3^ inseparable. 

* *yt US ^ become bird-lime, i.e. i 

stick to a person, not j 
move. 

^IJ Ull f . , enmity between or amonssl 

reciprocal enmity. 

not bemg straightforward. 

* ^^ -^^^ C^ v^-^ ) to pursue, be intent on (in * 

evil sense). 

* J%?H J' shrewd, one who sees througl 

a brick-wall; often usa 
ironically. 

* V ^ JJ ( to glare, fly into a passion. 
^/ U^^^ ^^ J^J to glare in anger. 

* ^^A; ^^S one's honour to be preserved; 

{IdH = 8ur^ru,%). 

* UX.; i^-Jlf ^J to use filthy abuse. 

* ljj£ i^a ^J to use violent or offensive 

language of. 

* ^^* Jj^^-r^f ^ ^^ ^®*^ death, lit. 

* <t«|J ^ i^^J accent in speech. 

♦ liT i^'la-^ 4j^ *^ *^® ^^^^ death, worried to 

death ; lit. and met. 

* v^^*5 V Struggling together. 

* ^y >^l*3 ^4r?=^ ^ ceaseless string of words. 

* UU. cX/ lit. to be loaded ; fig. to be 

loaded and done with. 



^ £5m *a/ for Za*no« and kaflr and tottrS and kun. 
it i« I.JI *' "'' is properly the peel of an apple when so peeled that 
It IS one continuous shred : also = a small shredVof onion, etc. 



77 



* ULiJ , !»/* 



♦ oiri j*j 



* bU J^ AiUJ 



* Ul^ sj:. 












to seek out a quarrel, bring 
a quarrel on oneself. 

cast out rubies ^ or sweet 
words ; often used ironically 

for U^f^A), q.v. 
= lJlaJ^ ^jkM^ q.v. 
p 

to put words into the mouth 
of (one forgetting a word, or 
saying a wrong word). 

to follow in the beaten track ; 
to be the slave of old cus- 
toms. 

ditto. 

to beat the trail of a snake, i.e. 
shut the door after the steed 
is stolen. 



*cJIf»ii-5Ii about = ^!L iL^'^^K 






.. .. 

♦ ULilj ^^^ 



to have a love intrigue with. 
vide infra, 

lit. to set on fire at one end and 
extinguish at the other, i.e. 
to stir up enmity by in 
trigue, to make mischief. 

to love, gen. 

to satisfy one's longing. 



to wheedle, 
to die. 

he down at full length (and 
generally to sleep). 

tell a long story ; brag. 



1 La*l is properly spinel. 



78 

* (U-«»S l) ) liibjjb ^Jijytsi met. = load a celibate life ; a 

to gird up the loins 
fight. 

« k3JiJ (JLj.ixJ a celibate faqir. 
* Ulx*i u/U> .J^ ^^ ^o squander in pover 

• »l^ IjiJ^J intimate friend (who will i 

pear before you with only 
langot on). 

( UU-yb b) Uyt) (i3»^ ciijy to be restless. 



9 / 



* ( )U u£j>y Ij) wfjy«4^ CL>y plundering wiawy places orp 

pie. 

* ^'^ S^'* ^y *<^ ^^® spiced (good, enticij 

words. 

% Uoi..} Uty (of great fighting with sword 

* ( liU. vs;*'* li ) *i>l^ IV ^ admit the superiority of. 

• ^"1 Uy adj. = hard, strong. 

# UUa^ Ji*. £- ^ J =to perform a difficult tasl 

# U)l3t lLjU^ .L A^ Ht. to disembark a person 

place; fig. to kill with 

*Uyi tJo) ^b^) ( to toil hard. , 

* ( Uyt b) lil».yb K^M>^ y^ (expresses fear). 



♦ ( U Jb l> ^ UU»it jji^ ♦-J to be wanting in natural afl 
V r*' w .T- ^ rr tion; cold, indifferent. 

« (LuUj ^ c?^ ^ ) ^'Ji jlf ^ *o *^^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^'® ^^^^• 

* C U)U L>^ liUS I ii»a. ^ •J (expresses the excitation 
V >^ - ; ^ ^/-rr ^ natural affection). 

* ^ uT*^ v-/ -^*^ (expresses bloodshed). 



* liw ci^^ ^S- £- ^ to bear meekly ; ( = althougl 

is disagreeable to drink dn 
of blood, still I did so). 



79 

* uuu ^jk^ u^'^i^ j^^ yt^ (®*^*^ ^y ^^^ ^^^ ^^^®® * ^^^y 

small share and then claims 
equality with those that 
have toiled). 

* ^j^ ^l^ y^ to besmear with blood. 
* U^; A^Ut ji^ y^ =to slay. 

* U/ 1 ^0 ^ = rebuke. 

* <i- tf^J J^ adv. altogether, in all (pri- 

marily after making all de- 
ductions). 



• ^S JjJ ^ vji^aI = 4/ <-^ r^> procrastinate. 
^ JJ jUH^Cy f!^ ^ ) ditto. 



#ULJIJ 



# Uuuj t^J = '^•iJ^, q.v. 

# .J ILii s^ i-_tl UuJ ^"^ have neither to take one 
-^ - .. - from him nor give him two) : 

having nothing to gain or 
lose. 

* ^ ^^ ^ t^ A^ ~ I have no business with him; 
^"^ " ^ ** (I am neither his debtor 

nor his creditor). 

r 

* 4/^ tt/t^ «^^ ^^ abuse a gerson's family. 

* < A < L? Lit* {fiuinaknJa, intr., to ring on 
^^^ ^ metal ; lit. to throb, of the 

head ;) fig. it suddenly struck 

me (from small indications). 

* tila^ r r' 1 V^ the fault was wrongly laid 

• '->^' J ^ to (his) door. 

* ti^ I^U to wander about idly or in 

distress. 



1 But 2« cl0-jkor=adv. in all, altogether. 



80 

* tilf^ ( ^jjUisub) ^{jy<ss^ LM/o = enjoj'' things without 

trouble, at another's ex- 
pense; {mama = maid-ser- 
vant). 

♦ (il^v Jit^ to fade, lose lustre ; also to 

fail when compared with. 

* l->v?^t t-fcL« = to become a widow. 

* I** .•>. I jtU convex, hog-backed; of horses 

* Sr 'roach-backed.' 

to take a jaunt (for sight-see- 
ing). 

to come to close quarters in 
fight; also to come face to 
face unexpectedly. 

• \jj^ ^^ v^^*^ ^ ^ive a bribe. 
* ^' ij^ v«5^ ^ ^® under the control of. 

# MA^ ^ lyt j^ ^^j^ to try an impossibiUty. 

* ti^ ob^ ,^I>« (^/ — ) to defile the dead; to spoil; 
•• •* to treat with indignity; to 

undervalue. 

* Uy jjL ^^^^ ditto. 







* l^l^yt ^^Ix» to be ruined ; also to be worth- 
less. 



* ^U^yH ^^ infirm, decrepit. 
»*» " 

* ^cA'^ v^ |V«^ ( v^t) = doleful e.;^ ^i^;. 

s 

* ^Jti ^j»»»syi ungrateful. 

♦^ vi^ y* after great difficulty. 



* <ii^ ^/* = i^ your life and after your 

death. 



81 



• uj:i 



a^r 






♦ ULI^ 






* ULjy xyo 



= UO [^ ^yk cu^ ; (not a very 
polite term). 

= a death -like pallor oame 
over (him). 

= ^yt^1 ^.^yo ^jf, q.y. 
= to sleep very soundly, 
fastidious. 

= t^V^cA^, affected and fas- 

tidious. 
a worthless thing 

to die and be effaced ; ( — par 
mar-mitna = to be sacrificed 
for). 

to dress wounds. 

to ask after a (well) person's 

health) ; (but l^/ «^^*j »Ujj of 
one sick). 

to have a good time with a 
• sweetheart. 






♦ liljtfi^y* to give scope to pleasure, 

revel; gen. term. 



tA^ 



<J 4t 






= you can't find another man 
like him. 



no clouds on the horizon; fig. 
the coast is clear. 

momentous (of battles, games, 
arguments). 



# liUL^j Ju# said when smelling a bad 
^ smell : hhinndnd, tr. and 

intr., to buzz (of a bee). 

to talk much; lit. to make 
one's brain bark. 



♦ UK 



'^> 



JU« 



11 



82 






= he wearied (me) 
talking. 

ditto. 



with 



to be cracked, mad; miet. only. 

to empty one's brain, talk or 
persuade much. 

to be sunk in poverty. 

to incur some unavoidable ex- 
pense in poverty, as of a 
poor Hindu on the death of 
a near relation. (If you add 
too much water tof your small 
stock of flour you must add 
more flour to set matters 
right). 

* ^^jjU. X« moonhght after midnight, or a 

cloudy night when the dim 
light may be mistaken for 
dawn; (crows and cocks call 
at this time, mistaking it for 
dawn); abo fig. the white 
beard of old rou6. 

* L/"-^ \,^S^ * skin-flint. 









to be idle. 

to hate the idea of being under 
an obhgation to any one ; to 
be independent. 

= to destroy utterly. 

adventurous ; also enterpris- 
ing, [etc.). 

make one late (as for a train, 

to chop logic : (ftogrfeartia, lit. 
to season with onions and 

ditto. 



83 



• -fei )ylB^ a favourite. 

* UU. JjtJ tL* = to be at the point of death- 

(of the head falling to one 
side). 

( ^W y) k) ^t H^ to look ill. 



•« 



^ 



ditto ! (indicating a small size 
with the fingers). 

to have thrush in the mouth, 
to speak rudely to, 
twilight of dawn, 
to make a wry face. 

styled, nominal (not so in real- 
ity), 
to keep quite silent. 

to utter. 

to have a squib discharged 
in one's face, i.e. to look 
blank, dismayed. 

jj sJxi offensive in speech. 
* UK^ ^ to be sulky. 

* ^ / JW V^ ^ speak openly without re- 

spect for politeness. 

* ^-'^ ^!^ ^ jy V^ to give a plain flat answer. 

• lil^i^ 8^ = bOl^ A^ to be sulky: (the 

idea is to stick out the lips 
like a snout). 

♦ v^tL cS^Aj liXa. s^ to pretend to be well-to-do. 

(The Lucknow people rub 
gh% on their lips to pretend 
they have eaten pila, o). 



|»(tJytL)ULrj^^^ 



84 



f V^ 



•« 






» ( by c^i> b ) ujy ^ ^v^ 



*;5 






abusive. 

to be bewildered, lost in aston- 
ishment. 

[Ex. Munh dekhe k% mahabbat 
= friendliness to one's face 
(but not behind one's back)]. 

= lif (J^ Lo liJi A^, q.v. 

(said contemptuously to the 
young when showing con- 
ceit in knowledge or expe- 
rience). 

to disgrace. 

= is it as easy as eating a 
small morsel ? 

to take the words out of one's 
mouth. 

to eat one's words, to be con- 
victed out of one's own 
mouth. 

lit. to apply the lips to : fig. to 
make an inferior familiar. 

to look foolish when frustrated 
or disappointed. 

demanded, requested, 
to give a treat to. 
to throw a sop to. 
to speak very low. 

to water (of the mouth from 

Idlach). 
= I haven't the face to speak 

to him. 



« byj i^^{^ = to fiU to the brim = ( v^V) 



85 



« 4^ ^ 



^ (.ii^ ( V ) 



a secret warning said by 
Sbi*ahs of a Sunni arriving 
amongst them: lit. ''he is 
one of them." 



* U.^ v«5^'^^ hair-splitting. 



» — A$ ( A. ^1^ 






9 



^ ^5^v^r* 



out of the frying-pan into the 
fire ; also to upbraid in every 
way that is unpleasant. 

you are playing with death 
to — . 

to die a natural death ; opp« to 

coarse, rough (of food or 
clothes. 

to rain cats and dogs ; (lit. 
streams of pestles). 

ditto. 

to be soft-hearted. 

to soften another's heart, 

weak, easilv led. 
to beat to a jelly. 

said of a small child of a dead 
person. 



♦ y^ d^ ni- > Pretty Polly (of a pcorrot ) : 

also one that learns like a 
parrot : also one that praises 
himself. 

* y^^ sJ^ a primary schoolmaster ; often 

contemptuous. 






a wolf in sheep's clothing. 

the coast is clear: there are 
no obstacles in the way 
also no decent people are left 
in the field, fig. 



86 



|u>« ( y ^^^ftSR^ tj yx:x. ^^^ ) = declined with thanks. 



# ^^lU 






Mela 



fairs and shows ; also cro^rded 
places. 



» liljJ A ilk^ fig. to set people by the ears 

for fun, make them quarrel 
through mere mischief. 



V (V 



fig. to lead a person a dance. 

to pare or cut the nails. 

misrule. 

an order that must be obeyed. 

= liU.^A (^^^xLo, q.v. 

to wound the feelings deeply 

f., a thin fine noBe. 

a big swollen-looking nose. 

aquiline nose with a bump in the 
bridge. 

to be honoured (opp. to ^^ ^^ 
to be disgraced). 



* liUija. ^^ {^ Ij to frown. 
♦ Ul|^ ^'^^ j^ JJ^ (j^^ v^ Li to speak crossly. 






* t-iUtja. c-Tli to frown. 



= to be flat-nosed; (pahya 
wheel). 

to pay up (expresses contempt; 
as to a dun). 

to be hot-tempered. 
vide under 4#*^*. 



87 






Uyt JU (f ^U ( ^ ^ ) 



* ( Uyb 

^J ^ S^\j (^ A^ ^-^) 



= I'll force him to eat gram 
with his nose, i.e. I'll give 
him a bad time, make him 
sorry for himself. 

— ty^j »2i>* to preserve one's 
honour. 

to be a favourite with. 

to disgrace. 

to allow one's self to be dis- 
graced. 

to be disgraced. 

ditto. 

to follow one's nose; also » as 
the crow flies. 

to rub one's nose, i.e. express 
great humility, eat dirt. 

ditto. 

to speak through one's nose 
(as opium-smokers and 
opium-eaters are said to do). 

to be greatly worried. 



to worry another much. 

passive : not to be able to put 
one's nose inside, i.e. not to be 
able to endure the stench of. 



« ILv) •f) u-Tti ,j^li cram with food. 

* tU^I J^ one's name to be bandied 
' about, to become notorious. 

#(i^ l»U 43J ^U to give a person a bad name 

unjustly. 

^ A woman's nose is out oft for infidelity. 



88 



* ( Uyt b ti^ ) J; ^l> 

• ( 4/ I'iii t^. ) V (.li 

* (i/ iL ^li u ) / ^0 

• U» ^li ( If ^^ ) 






to give a child a name ; abo 
to nickname (in dislike) ; to 
vilify. 

to destroy one's good name, 
to make a name for oneself. 



nominated ; also betrothed, 
to make a name for oneself. 

ditto and die; leave a good 
reputation behind one. 

nominally. 

to accuse falsely of. 

to mention. 

to become notorious, a bye- 
word. 

(want, maternal grandmother) : 

= as helpless as a child. ^ 

the pulse to cease beating (at 
or near death). 



vide ^yt> ^,> ^-ji>« kiU. 



♦ liyt ^i^ii expresses prostitution : as a 

nose-ring is a sign of virginity. 
(There is a ceremony of ini- 
tiation for a girl first becom- 
ing a prostitute). 



mJ M A = ups and downs. 



^ A child in distress calls on its nanl — even if its mother is beat- 
ing it. 



89 






#UU. ti>^ s-^x^i 



• • •• 

*^y wo. 



1 • . • . 



to speak affectedly (in a haw- 
damme way, or as certain 
Mawlavis do). 

= byf ULJ lit. and met. vide 

— lyf LiJ ^»>a/i = to ran away 
like an antelope. 

introduces an unpleasant topic, 
vide Hind, 3faw.,p. 226 (4). 

Compare also ^^'j^'^ j' ^y^ 

and cir^»N il w»f. 

to be unlucky in any special 
thing. 



vide t<i^! 

of one's luck 6ghting for one. 

to fall to the luck of. 

to take the eye or faiifjy of (of 
a thing or person) : to be an 
object of envy (in bad sense). 

to make an object of envy. 

to remove from favour. 

to lose favour with ; fall in 
the estimation of. 

the evil-eye = iXj z*^. 

to cast the evil-eye on. 

to judge at sight. 

selfishness of a number, a race 
for self. 

ditto. 



1 There is an h€Utif that, on the Day of Judgment* aU except 
Ma^ammad will cry out nafa-i nafa-l ''myself, myself." But the Pro- 
phet will say ummat-i ummat-r ** my people, my people." 

12 



90 









* UJ^ ; ^ J^AuJo 



•^ ^ *^ ^' 



^ 



y^ 



ti ) UUjy (i»^ (ijy^ v^i 



ti ) UT 






adv. =&^ (^^ ^5 publicly. 

the belly to become a drum 
from drinking. 

to be struck with astonish- 
ment ; gen. also to be stag- 
gered. 

= weaving ropes of sand. 

= indelible. 

to deface, mar. 

disdainful ; also ill-tempered. 

f . , a vein in the nose ; {ndks r 
phtttna, to bleed at the 
nose). 

= not to be in the least 
injured = l^t^ ^ Jb. 

(lit. with cut nose) notoriously 
disgraced. 

from top to toe. 

lit. may (my) salt that he has 
eaten burst out on him in 
leprous spots: a curse for 
treachery. 

a servant, dependant. 

to be faithful. 
vide ^^^ ^/^ viiP- 

to be absorbed in money-get- 
ting ; to be wretched in trjdng 
to get wealth.^ 

stark-naked, 
ditto. 



1 The story is that a poor person got ninety-nine rupees and became 
wretched in trying to make it into 100. Vide Fallon's Hind. Proverbs. 



91 



a^^ Jj3 without ornaments, of a 
"^^ ' - woman.: lit. with the ears 

*(al80 huchchd) cut, as a dog, goat, etc.). 



* 4/ v^iy 






* ( 4/ g ) UUy Jy 



•• •• ^ 



ol 



♦ iri^^^ iCi^ 



^^i^' 



*GU 



i (i^ ^j^ ^ 



to live like a prince. 

mutual scratching and hair- 
pulling. 
= he has a holy look. 

light upon light; all the 
better ; also ironically = all 
the worse, piling Ossa on 
Pelion. 

at early dawn. 

polite for pina or ArAawa. 

ditto, 
a tiff, a slight quarrel in words, 
to show a clean pair of heels. 

adv., by heart. 
to get by heart. 

to be always saying. 

= wa iliar na hater : a corrup- 
tion of Urdu and Arabic; 
(ulld has no meaning). 

fsaid of a decrepit old man). 

= I can'tdo it, andlcan'tstop 
from doing it : (comes from 
a proverb of a snake taking 
a musk-rat in its mouth). 

adv., on a fasting stomach. 

to get a new lease of life ; said 
of one who has recovered 
from a dangerous illness; 
also fig. of an institution. 



92 









= no longer a stranger, 
(polite for 4/ oi,li^). 

lit. to down (in wrestling) : fig. 
to overpower, defeat. 

annihilate, 
fig. idleness. 



♦ KJ If Jxi 
( lit-. CU^I L ) UuLl jJiw 



f 1' ■ • . 



* Uyt ^j^ ,>jLj^ 

* 13U If^jJuo 



backbiting. 



= you are doing me a good turn 
and do you ask if I like it ? 
i.e. there is no need to ask. 

= my good turn to you is 
wasted, and more I'm found 
to be in fault. 

to become black and blue (from 
bruises, beating, etc.). 

stigma, slur. 

to change colour through anger. 

to glare. 

sleep to be dissipated; to be 
unable to sleep after one's 
sleep is broken or before. 

to suffer from insomnia, 
to sleep one's fill, 
to be broken, of sleep, 
not to sleep, purposely. 
not to sleep, involuntarily, 

always wanting to sleep. 

very sleepy ; lit. drunk from 
sleep. 



93 



• liyyi jJbU j^]j (^ ^_j«»$) 

« ILj «iu.l^ ( If 1^^ ) 

* yj^ «ij »I^ (^ «b ^j-^ ) 

•• •« 






to have no acquaintance of 

(a thing or person), 
to miss one's aim (of a blow, 

or sword-cut, etc.); lit. and 

fig- 

to adjure. 

to praise, applaud. 

ditto. 

to talk rubbish. 

a burden to one's life, met. 




«• «• 






(expresses lowliness and sad- 
ness). 

loving sohtude (of a man). 

U^Jb ^Jj\ tijj = i*)^j iJy; vird or vird- 

wazlfa one's 'portion' (of 
the Quran) ; also any fixed 
prayer or religious exercise. 

of ceremonial cleanliness, to be 

broken. 
= his days are numbered. 

in season and out of season, 
adv., in time of need. 

= I am in trouble. 



= ^y isi^ ^^y 



* ULJl <iujU ^ '**^®® ^^^ hands in salutation 

or prayer. 

« tjl|il *^jUt ( ^ ^j^ v^**^ ) to abandon doing a thing ; re- 
nounce ^jA jl^ c>-«c>. 

• lil A^Ub to be obtained. 



94 






* '^Jy uS^, ^^^ 

* ^y uS*^ *^^ 

* GU fJLjy ^jjlj iJ^j'^ 

* Ulsxjt; o5^ ^'^ 

* ^'^ uS^i ^^ 

* UJKi u5^ *«^^ 

• lilUt 4j5^ ^^ 
* lijXj &^Ub 



to be well oflf. 

to lend a hand : (for hantnd to 
divide, etc. ?). 

to be miserly. 

to entreat. 

to extend one's business or 
schemes; to obtain fraudu- 
lently (i.e. using one's influ- 
ence beyond its proper 
limits) ; to take bribes. 

to sit idly at home, not to 
work. 

to suffer fever-pains in the 
hmbs. 

to become helpless. 

= die; also flg. expresses 
great grief at sudden news. 

to be worn out; also to be 
paralyzed. 

to swim ; fig. to struggle much, 
to begin one's pranks. 

= to make some slight effort. 

to be helpless, to be in an- 
other's power. 

to try an impossibility, 

to sit idly with folded hands. 



to fall into the possession of. 

to beg. 

to help = Uy f^j4 '^^^-•.i. 

to be hard up ; also to be 
miserly, for Lyfc ^ a^Ia q.v. 



95 



• (i^ IJ^^ ^(jt to dirty the hands with food. 

* v^^^ *^^ dexterity, sleight of hand; 

light-fingeredness (thievish- 
ness). 

* •^^3- ^^ to use the fists freely ; to use 

any weapon. 

* ^jy^ ^^ to strike at with the fist or 

hand. 

^j^]*y L» ) U'lf ^ uy^'*^ *«^^ (expresses regret). 

♦(li4Xjj ^^ J b ) U^ yt J *^Ut to be in despair of. 

* ^^ jidS^y^*^ ^^ *^ peruse closely, persecute, 

stick to. 

• tiyti5 A^Ub ( ^1. yx^ ^^^ ) despair of. 

* LUI5 A^Ub touch ; engage on a business ; 

meddle, interfere. 

"" ^J"-^^ ^^iui^ j^ v^) practise and make perfect (as 

handwriting). 

* Jh^ ^ *f^^ filthy lucre, trash. 

*^J ijiyi)^ ^. )jiuy^^ ^^ no* to listen to; to deny 

knowledge of. 

* ^ *^^?^ ^^ y ^^ = I will pay the debt only to 

^ him I owe it and know. 

* ^*^' ^^ = my fingers itch to—. 

* lil^S «^U to be generous ; also not to be 

hard up. 

* Ui^ A^lit to be open-handed, generous. 



] Pa.oh ihufa parna to miss the step (or rung of a ladder), to make 
any faJao step, lit. not fig. 



96 

* 0U.j1 ^yia i- i^SU vide, ^^ & Ly . 

♦ UKJ A^Ub to touch; to begin doing a 

thing. 

* {jXi d^Ut to be obtained. 

* tijU *^ljb ( jj jx^ v-5^^ ) ^ steal ; to strike at ; (khdne 

par — ) to commence eating 
hungrily. 

# li;L« AfiUt jj A^SUt to conclude a bargain ; make 

a promise. 

• UlU A^SUt to join hands, shake haoids, 

^ to claim equality. 

* UlL« ^(jt to regret. 

♦ ^^J ij^ ^i^ A^tJt to be careful not to offend. 
♦ UuJ <^3U ->» jL^jUt hand in hand. 

* {jS ilj I45U) to scuffle. 

.. 

♦ ^U* ^^3lit from hand to hand. 

* UuJ A^jUb ^j^jUb to welcome, receive hospitably 

(of a plural subject). 

* (iV> ^^ ^ pledge oneself to; to assent 

^ ■ Sr^ to a proposition. 

• GlU ,jljt jj^ ^jUt to say yes, yes, you are right, 

in vot ing etc . , either through 
folly or flattery. 

• liU. J t ^^ to gobble up ; embezzle. 

# U,$ ^..^Ji ^^>ji to eat or to speak like toothless 

^ • * old people. 

* ULi ,c»J^ '^J^ to stroke, caress; to embezzle; 

- " * steal ; clear off everything 

by theft t ^{^ ^j^ ) ; to 
eat greedily. 

# ^_^-g < J^ijb adj. free with his hands, given 

to striking. 

* ]Sx^ '«iJt a knack, fig. and lit. ; sleight of 

^ hand ; trick, artifice. 

* {jjb^ Sjb = to manage to obtain or get 

hold of. 



97 






WW WW 

• liU^ ir^t ( ^; ) 



^ ^ 









« ( Oyt b ) Ua; t Ktt 



4;^ 



to lay down one's arms, 
to be careless of death. 

to attempt an impossibility; 
also = you have not let the 
grass grow under your feet 
in accomplishing this: vidt 

hale and sound. 

to hesitate before acting; to 
flinch from doing. 

luxuriant (of garden, grass, 
crops). 

of a wound, to break out 
afresh. 

to digress and return to the 
point. 

a master of all trades ; versa- 
tile. 

run away ; disappear, gen. 

to force to repeat ; to force to 
die, to kill. [A Hindu in 
Bengal is made to say Hari 
near his death]. ^ 

to gobble up ; embezzle, 
common people. 

to be struck dumb with amaze- 
ment, 
to say yes or no. 

very light, 
messmate. 



«^«r.;* if *fken to the Ganges and ducked and told to shout Hari 
even If he protests that it is not the time for saying Hari. Should he 
survive thy treatment (and a few used to), he is considered a ghost and 
not allowed to rejoin his family. 

13 



98 









(husbands of sisters are Tiam- 
zulf to each other). 

adv., with one's heart and 
soul* 

= we ordinary people. 

explaining an explanation, taf- 
8tr Jn tafsir ; also = bal 1A 
kMU khlnchna, to be hyper- 
critical. 



* ^^^^^"'^^ adj., of smiHng face. 



to ) Uljt ,^g^^ ^ cyO) 
•• •* ^ 

*• 

* liyb ^_^ ( ^ ^^ ) 

* Jlc If yt 
* ( v^K>« Ij ) (•(.$>• If yt 



to carry off with a laugh. 

to make jokes (in words or 

acts), 
joking and jesting ; a light- 
matter, an easy laughing 

matter, 
to be a laughing-stock, be 

laughed at. 
to grunt assent : (gen. used in 

negative), 
exactly in the same state ; also 

closely resembling, 
to shout God's name like a 

dervish, 
to become desolate (with none 

but God in it), 
any solitiairy place (where none 

but God is). 

ditto. 

tp make a name fpr oneself, 
to take a change of air. 

= times have changed. 

said when sickness is rife ; 
met. to get a bad name, the 

opp. of ^'i^^ fjA. 

to build castles in the air ( = 
liKj ^Jlj tjJUa.) : to calum- 
niate. 



99 



* UjJ ^ lyb 
• (UU.uXiL)Ujy|yfc 






« yt yt 



* ULfc; y^ ( IS' ^_^ ) 
# uut y las^ i/«yt 



to be swift* 

to make light of, treat one's 
words as nothing. 

to be hasty in departure (of a 
visitor). 

to change, of time, 
ditto. 

airy, well-ventilated ; also a 
well-wisher. 

to be swift, gen. of horses. 

to be quarrelsome, scolding; 

gen. of women, 
to take the air. 

be off, go away, I won't listen 
to you. 

to be exposed to the air, 
given an airing ; also = to 
catch infection, lit. and met. 

to try an impossibihty. 
disappear. 

exactly the same ; as it was ; 
closely resembling. 

closely resembling. 

all relations (prop. Hving and 
dead). 

to keep to, stick to ; (but Ao- 
rahna alone = to be done 
some time or other). 

to make one lose one^s senses. 

not to be in one's senses. 

ditto. 

come to your senses, met. 
only. 



loo 



• «• 



ditto, butilit. and met. 

to come to the age of discre' 
tion; also= ^j lAj^* 

come to your senses, 
ditto. 

to be haunted by a dread of, 
terror of, 

to hum and haw, not to give 
a decided answer. 

* 4^ uy^ uy^ ^o whimper hun hun ; to make 

a noise like palki-bearers ; 
to groan in sickness. 

to Uck the lips, fig. and met. 

to bite the lip, in anger or 
regret. 

to barter ; buying and return- 
ing the goods to the shop, 
to twist and turn. 






* 4;^ SrO^ to use force. 

# liCit) lJ^Ia^ to be bed-ridden from dysen- 
tery ; to lie about idly and 
not work. 



u? 



«» 



« aiu i iijb = God keep him (of an absent 
J^'^ • friend). 

♦ \J^^. )k sociable, a jolly fellow. 

* J^ /i an intimate friend. 



101 



^ V-"" I to become cuts with ; (children 

[ indicate this by knocking 

( their under-jaw up so that 

* (iJb t<iJ Jli I theteeth make a ktd noise).^ 

« UT u:Ji^ \i xi» b (= the time of death). 

* \^\S yy J^A. cJo { = very intimate friends). 

• JS i^ with one stroke of the pen ; 
* " all at once. 

* ur..^^ (^ in a lump sum. 

* u5* O!^ '^^ nothing, for no special 

purpose. 

* ^ \^ Uyi ordinary; not up to much. 

•• 

I A desire to renew friendship is expressed by hooking the little 
fingers, closing the fists and blowing through them in the direction of 
the estranged friend. 



Baptist HiMion Pyeoi, Caloqtta. 



INDEX. 



Abandon, p. 93 ; p. 95, last line. 

Ablutions, vide Purity. 

Vbode, take ap one's, p. 74. 

Vbont, p. 77 

Vbscondy p. 48. 

Vbsent friend, p. 100, 1. 25. 

Vbsorbed, in thought, p. 47 : — in 

gain, p. 90. 
A-bundant, to be, p. 30. 
V.buse, chide, p. 3: return—, p. 5: 

pp. 8; 30; 34, L 14; 38:— rate, 

p. 66, 1. 6: p. 67, 11. 20 and 21 : 

to—, p. 79. 
Vbusive, p. 84. 
\.ccent (in speech), p. 76. 
\.ooept, to force to, p. 70. 
\.coount, of no, p. 59, U. 6 and 8. 
\.oouse falsely, p. 88. 
Acquainted, become, p. 92. 
Act, p. 32, 11. 27 and 29:— on, 

p. 46. 
Acted on, be, p. 46. 
Adjure, to, p. 93. 
Admiration, frozen from, p. 13. 
Admire, pp. 5; 45 and 60. 
Vdmitted, of words, p. 58. 
^do, make a great, p. 52, 11. 17, 

23, 24, 25. 
k.doipt, to, p. 71. 
V.drift, out oneself, p. 27. 
Adventurous, p. 82. 
Ldversity, fall into, p. 33. 
Ldvice, approved c^, p. 5. 
Lffected, p. 81. 
Lfifeotedly, to speak, p. 89. 
Lffeotion, lose or lack, p. 23: 

matenud — . p. 63: laddng in 

— , p. 78 : p. 78. 
Lfflict the afiOioted, p. 30, last line ; 

and p. 81, 1. 1. 
wfreeh, p. 36. 

Lge of discretion, to reach, p. 100. 
.gree heartily, to, p. 27. 
oling, always, p. 56, 1. 1 : ever — , 

p. 74 : ffide Loivalid. 
ir, bad, p. 98 : change of — , p. 

98 : budld castles in the — , p. 98 : 

take the — , p. 99, 1. 13: expose 

to the — , p. 99, 1. 16. 



Airing, give an, p. 99. 

Airy, p. 99. 

Alert, p. 19. 

Alienated from, p. 17, IL 21, 25 
and 32. 

All, one aud, p. 33: — in all, p. 
79:— at ODce, p. 101. 

Allure by promises, p. 6. 

Alone, p. 15. 

Aloof, keep, p. 38. 

Altogether, p. 79. 

Amaaement, dumb with, p. 97: 
vide Wonder and Astoniediment. 

Ambiguously, p. 72. 

Ambush, trap mto, p. 73, 1. 10. 

Amiss, something, p. 49. 

Amusing, comic, p. 31. 

Anger, be beside oneself from — or 
joy, p. 1 : not to be able to con- 
tain oneself for — ,p. 16, 1. 6: be- 
side oneself with — , p. 18: sup- 
press one's — , p. 32: p. 38, 1. 3 : 

■ red from — , p. 40:— (chan'^e 
colour), p. 44, 1. 18: suppress ~, 
p. 47, 1. 11 : mad with — ,p. 47, 
1. 15: gnash the teeth in — 
p. 57 : grind the teeth in — ] 
p. 67: to satisfy — , p. 69: 
change colour from — , p. 92: 
bite the lips from — , p. 100. 

Angry, p. 4: very— , p. 35: p. 47, 
1. 12: easUy gets — , p. 47, L 16: 
to be — , p. 70, last line. 

Anguish, weep in, p. 23. 

Annihilate, p. 92. 

Anonymous, p. 71. 

Answer, plain, p. 26: flat plain 
— , p. 83 : undecided — , p. 100. 

Applaud, p. 93, IL 8 and 9. 

Appreciate, not to, p. 21. 

Appreciated, make oneself, p. 25, 
IL 16 and 26. 

Approve heartily, p. 42, U. 28 to 
30. 

Approved, of advice, p* 5« 

Apron-strings, tied to, p. 73. 

Ardour, p. 69, IL 5 and 12. 

Argue much, p. 35. 

Arsument, convince in« p. 2 : be 
defeated in — , p. 7. 



104 



Aristocratic, p. 11, L 7. 

Arms, call to, too soon, p. 43 : lay 

down — , p 97. 
Arrest, to, p. 69, IL 24 and 27. 
Arrow, pierce, p. 13. 
Artifice, p. 96 : vide Trick. 
ArtificeH, p. 53. 

Ashamed, feel, p. 35, L 30 : p. 57. 
Ashes, burnt to, p. 21. 
Ask, — me not, p. 68 : what need 

to — , p. 92 ! vide Jnquire. 
Aspire to (contemp.), p. 40. 
Ass, p. 75 : vide Stupid. 
Assent to, p. 96. 
Assist, p. 55, and vide Hand (to 

lend a). 
Astonished, to be, p. 5: p. 84: 

vide Staggered. 
Astonishment, become frozen from, 

p. 13: struck with — , p. 53 : 
pp. 55 and 90. 
Attempt impossibility, p. 99. 
Attentively, Lsten, p. 64, 11. 28 and 

29. 
Aunt's house (intrude), p. 22. 
Avoid, notice, p. 4: p. 62: to 

— , p 69: — giving offence, 

p. 96. 
Awake, all night, pp. 4 and 31 , L 
20 : keep — , v%de Sleep. 



B 

Babble, of child, p. 47, last line. 

Back, show the baok. p. 13: show 
me yOur — , p 19. 

Backbiting, p. 92. 

Bad, inwardly but good outward- 
ly, p. 7 : give m — name, p. 7 : 
be on — terms, p. 24 : to give a 
' — ^time, p. 87 : 

Bandied about (name), p. 87. 

Bankrupt, go. p. 15. 

Bargain, to conclude, p. 96. 

Bark, of brain, p- 81. 

Barter, to, p. 100. 

Bastard, p. 56. 

Battle, take place, p. 66 : — , 
daughter in p 66 : win a — , 
p. 66: — of swords, p. 78, 1. 16. 

Battles, bloodshed, p. 14. 

Be off, p. 99 

Bear meekly, p 78. 

Beard, white, of old rou6, p. 82. 

Beat, vide Black and Blue; vide 
Jelly: — to a jelly, p. 11; 
p. 86 1 — head to a jelly, p. 66, 
U. 1 and 6. 



Bed, take to, through grief, p. 2: 

laid up in — , p. 10 
Bedridden from dysentery, p. lOO. 
Beg, to, p. 94. 

Beggars, a phrase used by, p 25. 
Begin, pp. 7 and 96 : — to eat. 

p. 96. 
Behead, p. 36, 1. 14 : — , etc 

p. 62,1. 12: p. 69. L 1 
Belly, grumble in the, p. 3: — . 
grumbling of, p. 51 : — to be 
distended, p 90. 
Belt, undo, p. 61. 
Bend the head, p. 36, U. 3 emd 6. 
Benefit, additional, p. 39, U 4. 
Bent on, p. 47, 1. 6. 
Beside oneself, (from joy or anger), 

p. 1 : — (anger), p. 18. 
Besmear with blood, p. 79. 
Betrothed, p. 88. 

Better and better, p. 39, 1. 4 : so 
much the — , p. 48 : all the — , 
p. 91. 
Bewilder one, p. 99, 1. 30. 
Bewildered, pp. 46 and 84. 
Bewilderment, p. 52. 
Binding undone, p. 41. 
Bird-lime. p. 76. 

Biting dog, p. 67. [p. 4'2 

Bitter, p. 68 : — taste (after fever;. 
• Blab,* a, p. 12 : to — , p. 30. 
Black, stout, man, p. 1 : — koa. 
p. 63 : — hair, p. 53 : — as jet. 
p. 63, U. 16 and 18 : — haired 
p. 63 ; — and blue, p. 92 : vidt 
Beat. 
Bladder, pricked, p. 41 : prick — , 

p. 48 1 2. 
Blame laid on a conspicuous pe^ 

son, p. 41. 
Blamed for doing a kindness. 

p. 92,1. 11. 
Blank, look, p. 83. 
Blarney, p. 19. 
Blasphemy, p 69. 
Blessing, p. 63, U. 14aad21: a—. 

p. 71, 1. 30. 
Blind (said ironically), p. 4 : — 

one-eyed man amongst, p. 3. 
Blindly, sheep-like, p. 8 
Blockhead, pp. 68 and 62 : vidt 

Foot. 
Blood, thirst for, pp 19 and 78 : ties 
of — , p. 23 : — , notie in body, 
p. 63: drink — , p. 78, 1. 31 
— , affection, p. 78 1. 31. 
Bloodshed, battles, p. 14 : pp. ?^ 
and 78. 



105 



Bloody, make, p. 79. 
Blossom, to p. 70, 11. 6 and 13. 
Blow, unesqpeoted misfortune, p. 2. 
Blown, p. 32. 
Bluster, to, p. 76. 

Boast, to, pp. 13 ; 27. 11. 24 and 
26; and 41. 

Boaster of past, fool, p. 8 ; — of 

wisdom, p. 46. 
Boasting, p 48. 
Bold, immodest, p. 26. 
Bone of contention, p. 48, 1. 23 
* Book-faced," p. 66. 
Bookworm, p. 66. 
Boon, additional, p. 39, 1. 4. 
Bore, a ** stop-tongue," p. 21, 1. 1 : 

*o — , p. 26,la8tline. 
Bosom, cherish snake in, p. 2. 
Bow down to, p. 60, 1. 10. 
Boys, noise, p. 26. 
Brain, weary one's, p. 36. 
Brag, to, p. 77. 
Brand, vide Stigma and Slur. 
Branded, p. 60. 
Bravo, to say, p. 12. 
3razen, p 8, U. 17 and 18. 
3reaoh, stand in, p 11. 
Break (in continuity), p. 47, 1. 6 : 

— out (of wound), p. 97. 
Breath, out of, p. 32: drawn in 

— , p. 38. 
Breed horses, p. 66. 
Bribe, to, p. 80. 
Bribes, to take, p. 94. 
3rimfu',p. 84. 
Broad-fronted, p. 69. 
Buffalo and lute = swine &ad 

pearl, p 8. 
Juild a house, p. 74 : — castles in 

the air, p. 98. 
buildings, destroy, p. 6. 
Sully, vide Bluster. 
Jurden, get rid of. p. 7, 1. 18: 

falls on — , p. 34: ~ to one's 

life. p. 93. 
burdensome, of life, p. 68, 1. 17 : 

to be — , p. 68, U. 18 and 20. 
(urnt,child,p. 10; -- to ashes, p. 

21. ^ 

Jury the hatchet, p. 43. 
business, wearisome, p 36: open 

a — , p. 62 : — with what, p. 67, 

!• 1 1 — with, no, p. 79 : enge^ 

in — , p. 96. 
(utt, a, p. 32. 
{ye-word, became a, p. 88. 
(ygones, p. 70. 



C 

Gain, raise, p. 31. 

Calamity, befall, p. 2: vide also 

Misfortune : overwhelming , 

p. 11 : bring on --, p. 62. 
Calumniate, p. 44, last line, and 

p. 98. 
Catnel, p. 41.1. 7. 
Cancel, p. 62 
Can'ti p. 66. 
Captivate, p. 41. 
Care, free from, p, 48. 
Careless, p. 76. 
Carelessness, p. 76. 

Caress and destroy, p. 36: to 

p. 96. 
Caricature, to, p. 22. 
Cash, flush of, p. 96, 1. 28. 
Castles in Spain, p. 23 : — in the 

air, p. 98. 
Cat, p. 41. 
Cats and dogs, to rain, p. 85. 

* Catch,' a, p. 39, L 2, and p. 61. 
Cause, bad, p. 9. 
Cauterized, to be, p. 70. 
Caution, excess of, p. 10. 
Ceiling, stare at (be near death), 

p 4. 
Celibate life, lead, p. 78 : a — , p. 

78, 1. 4 
Cemetery, p. 41. 
C»air. take a, p. 66, 1. 16. 
Chalk and cheese, pp. 31, 37 and 

66,1 8 
Chameleon, fickle as, p. 69. 
Chance, rii^, p. 13 
Change, of fortune, p. 61. 11. 1, 2 

and 7 : take a — , p. 98. 
Changeable, pp. 66, 1. 1, and 74. 
Changed, quite, p. 66: p. 67:—-- 

• times, p. 98. 

Changed for the better, times, p, 

26: p. 68. 
Charm, p. 41. 
Chaste, of words, p. 16. U. 22, 25 

and 26 : — not. of words, p. 15, 

1. 24. 
Chatter, pp. 62 and 93. 
Cheat, p. 71,1. 12. 
Check oneself in speaking, p. 5. 
Cheek, vide Face: to have the — , 

p. 59, 1. 12. 
Cheerful countenance, pp. 69 and 

98,1 10. 
Cheery, p 48.1. 6. 
Cheese and ohalk, pp. 31 « 37 and 

66, L 8. 



106 



Cherish, pp. 39 and 70. 

Chide, abuse, p. 3. 

Child, to be with, p. 10 : — of one 
dead, p. 85. 

Child-birth, recovery, p. 75. 

Child's lisping, p. 47. 

Children, pp. 57 and 58 : with — , 
pp. 63 and 71,1. 30. 

Choke-full, p. 65. 

Chop off head, p. 36 : — logic, p. 
82, U. 33-36. • 

Claim, make a, p. 69, 11. 24 and 27. 

Claws, show one's, p. 12, 11. 6 and 
25. 

Clean gone, p. 43: — sweep of, 
p. 43 : — sweep of, make, p. 96. 

Cleanliness, vide Purity and Ablu- 
tions. 

Cling to, p. 11. 

Close, to, p. 24 : — to, in fight, p. 
80, 11 12 and 28 : — quarters, 
come to, p. 80, 11. 12 and 28. 

Clothes from the wash, p. 65. 

Cloudless, p. 81. 

Cloudy, p. 75. 

Clumsy person, saying to, p. 4. 

Coals to Newcastle, p. 77, 1. 7. 

Coarse, p. 85. 

Coast clear, pp. 81 and 85. 

Coat according to doth, p. 18. 

Coil round, p. 71 : to — , p. 75. 

Cold, season, p. 58: pleasant — , 
p. 70, indifferent — , p. 78. 

Collar tOt p. 69, U. 24 and 27. 

Colour, change, p. 44, 1. 18: — , 
change from anger, p. 92. 

Combination against, hrom, p. 34. 

Come, p. 50, 1. 8. 

Comforts, unaccustomed, p. 67, I. 
13. 

Comic, p. 31. 

Coming and going, p. 100. * 

Commentary on a commentary, p. 
98. 

Commingled, p. 74, and vide Min- 
gled. 

Common people, wrangling of, p. 
57 : p. 97. 

Commotion, make a, p. 44. 

Communication, p. 37. 

Completely, p. 43 

Complements exchange, p. 42. 

Concealed, vide Hidden. 

Conceited, p. 23. 

Conceive, vide Imagine. 

Concoct plans, p. 65. 

Concubine, p 74, 1. 17. 

Condign punishment, p. 50. 



Condiments, p. 69. 
Confidant, treacherous, p. 74. 
Confounded, to be, p. 34: — at 

pp. 44 and 96. 
Confront danger, p. 39, 1. 25. 
Confuse one's brain, p. 25. 
Confusion, cause, p. 32 : — an 

noise, p. 72. 
Connection, no, p. 67. 
Connive at, p. 44. 
Conscience, prick, p. 25, L 19. 
Consternation, p. 37. 
Contain oneself, from joy, p. 12 

not to be able to — , p. 16, U. t 

to 8. 
Contempt, bring into — , p. 4 : - 

for ability or knowledge, p. 56. 
Contention, cause of, p. 48, 1. 22 

bone of — , p. 48, 1. 23. 
Control, under, p. 80. 
Convex, p. 80. 
Convicted, t^ide Month. 
Convince in argument, p. 2. 
Coolness, pleasant, p. 70. 
Copy, to, p. 44. 
Countenance, cheerful, p. 98, I 

10. 
Counter, dealings over the, p. 65. 
Crabbed, writing, p. 19. 
Cracked, p. 82. 
Cram, to, p. 87. 
Crawl, p. 19. 
Credulous, p. 55. 
Critical, state, be in, p. 44, vtd 

Hypercritical. 
Criticize, p. 20. 
Crocodile's tears, p. 15. 
Crossly, speak, p. 86. 
Crow files, as the, p. 87. 
Crowd, to p. 65 : confused — , p 

68. 
Crowded, p. 13 : — places, p. 86. 
Crowned with success, p. 35. 
Cr3nng, burst out, p. 11 : 90 

Weeping. 
Cudgel, v*de Lathl-^lay. 
Cuff, slap, p. 35. 
Cunning, or deceitful woman, p. 1 

— , smart, p. 19: — rogue, p. 6S 
Curse, a, hail, p. 10 : pp. 18 and 43| 

a—, pp. 26, 31, and 67, 1. sl 

to — , p. 75. 11. 27 to 28: —fa 

treachery, p. 90. 
Curses on, rain, p. 11. 1 

Cursing, keep on, p. 9, IL 17 an 

20 : p. 63, 11. 6 and 6. j 

Customs, slave of, p. 77, U. 11 aJ 

14. 



107 



^ut, a friendi p. 4 : — one's coat, 
p. 18 : — one's coat, etc., p. 18 : 
— off at a blow, p. 62 : be — up, 
pp. 56 and 67. 

I^ate, to be, p. 2. 

:?ate with, p. 101. 

IJy press-like, p. 37. 

D 

daggers drawn, p. 17. 

[>ainn it, p. 72. 

Oance, as puppet, p. 4 : lead one a 
— , p\ 62 : lead a — , p. 86. 

Oandy, vide Fop. 

danger, be in, p. 14 : — to one's 
life, p. 20 : escaped from — , p. 
22, L 26 : to face — , p. 39 : put 
a person's life in — , p. 72. 

Oangerous, or poisonous person, p. 
6: —to life, p. 86,1. 9. 

Dare to — , p. 66, last line. 

Dark-complezioned, p. 71. 

Oawn, before, p. 91, 1. 12. 

Day, weary, p. 1 1. 

Days, to nu];nber one's, p. 46 : — , 
numbered, p. 93. 

Dazzled, be, p. 18. 

Dead, speak ill of, p. 49 : talk ill of 
the — , p. 70 : — and buried, 
p. 76, 11. 14 and 16 : to defile the 
— , p. 80, 11. 18 to 22 : talk ill of 
— , p. 81. 

Deaf, may the devil be, p. 42, 1. 
9 ; to be — to, p. 96, 1. 20. 

Deafened, ears, p. 64. 

Dealings over the counter, p. 66. 

Death, be near, pp. 4, 48 and 72 : 
near — , pp. 18, 22, 46 and 76, 
11. 21 and 23 : just escape — , p. 
22 : grieved at a — , p. 24, 11. 1 
and 3 : hovers over — , p. 61 : 
escape — , p. 72 : at the point of 
— > PP" 74 and 83 : worried to — , 
p. 76, 1. 23 : natural — , p, 86 : 
play with — , p. 86 : untimely 
— , p. 86 : earless of — , p. 97 : 
time of — , p. 101; also vide 
Days numbered : vide Die. 

Death-like pallor, p. 81. 

Debt, to pay, p. 96. 

Deceitful, vide Cunning. 

Deceive, pp. 14 and 33 ; — by pro- 
mises, p. 49. 

Deceived, to be, p. 49. 

Decent people all gone, p. 86. 

Deception, p. 26, 1. 26. 

Declined with thanks, p. 86. 



Decrepit, and old, p. 33, 1. 23: 
p. 80 : — old man, p. 91 : vide 
Old. 

Deface, to, p. 90. 

Defeat, to, p. 92; vide Conquer, 
Overpower and Town. 

Defect, p. 9 : slight — , p. 49. 

Defile the dead, p. 80, 11. 18-22. 

Defy, to, p. 69. 

Delay, without, p. 65, 1. 14. 

Delicate of touch, p. 33. 

Delighted, to be, p. 24. 

Demanded, requested, p. 84. 

DemoUsh, to, p. 68. 

Deny, p. 96. 

Depart, pp. 12 and 19. 

D^>endant, a, p. 90. 

Dependent, homeless, p. 26, 1. 21. 

Dervish, shout like a, p. 98. 

Describe, tongue cannot, p. 30. 

Described, too many to be, p. 19. 

Deserted, place, p. 21 : — by 
friends, p. 61. 

Desist, not to, p. 2. 

Desolate, become, p. 98. 

Despair of, p. 95, 11. 12 and 15. 

Destroy, buildings, p. 6 : p. 23, 1. 
1 : — utterly, pp. 34 and 82 : — 
while caressing, p. 35 : pp. 46 
and 86. 

Destroyed, be, p. 22, I. 2 : — , 
murdered, lit. and met,^ p. 23. 

Destruction, court, p. 30. 

Detection, to fear, p. 12. 

Devil, of a, pp. 7 and 47, 1. 22 : play 
the — with, p. 33, 11. 26, 26 and 
27 : possessed by — , p. 33, 1. 3 ; 
p. 42, 11. 1 and 3 : — deaf, p. 
42 : surpass — , p. 42 : a very — , 
p. 42 : notorious as — , p. 42, 1. 
4 : — 's aunt ( wicked) , p. 42 : 
— 's guts, p. 42 : play the — 
with, p. 47, U. 19 and 20 ; p. 52, 
1. 16 : lucky — , p. 61 : — and 
deep sea, p. 91, 1. 24. 

Devoted (lovers, friends), p. 47. 

Dexterity, p. 96. 

Die, to, pp. I, 31, 46, 61, 74, 77: 
— prematurely, p. 17 : — living 
death, p. 18 : p. 21 : p. 23, 1. 2 : 
to — , contemp. p. 27 : — in 
sleep, p. 38 : — of joy, p. 39 : — 
(of infidels), p. 49: — dog's 
death, p. 66 : — and be effaced, 
forgotten, p. 81 : — well spoken 
':i of, p. 88, 1. 6: p. 94 : to force to 
— , p. 97 : vide Death. 



108 



DifiEerence, all the, p. 2 : valst — , 

p. 31 : least — , p. 36. 
Different, quite, p. 67. 
Difficult, matter, pp. 16 and 63 : 

perirorm — task, p. 78. 
Difficulties , to be in, p. 43. 
Difficulty, get out of, p. 10 : with 

— , pp. 22 and 80 : grapple with 

— , pp. 44,1.6 and 46, 1. 11: 

fall into a — , p. 67 : to arise — , 

p. 69. 
Dig out information, p. 66. 
Digging out, p. 68. 
Digress and return, p. 97. 
Diminution, loss, p. 20. 
Dirt, to eat, pp. 73 and 87. 
Dirty, to, p. 73, L 1 : become — , 

p. 73, 1. 9 : — (of hands), p. 95. 
Disappear, clean, p. 46 : pp. 49, 1. 

2 ; 63 and 97 : to — , p. 99 : vide 

Run away. 
Disappoint, p. 74, 11. 9 and 12. 
Disappointed, to be, p. 14 : — in a 

person, p. 26 
Discharge an obligation, p. 33, 1. 

14. 
Disciple of prostitute, p. 64. 
Disposed, secret, p. 13: — , of 

secret, p. 77, 1. 6 : vide Secret. 
Discouraged, feel, to, p. 25. 
Discretion, years of, p. 100. 
Disdainful, p. 90. 
Disgrace, p I : hold up to — , pp. 

6 and 17: to — , pp. 20, 1. 28; 

53, i). 21 and 22 and 87, 1. 8 : 

pp. 54 and 84. 
Disgraced, pp 1, 39 and 60 : to be 

-, pp. 86 and 87, 11. 11 and 12 : 

allow oneself to be — , p. 87, 1. 

9 : — notoriously, p. 90. 
Dishevelled, p. 35, 1 1. 
Dislike, look of, p. 58. 
Dismayed, look, p. 83. 
Disorder, throw into, p. 43. 
Disperse, p, 14. 

Dispersed, to be, p. 13, 11. 6 and 7. 
Displecisure, get rid of, p. 25. [26. 
Disposed, to feel ill, towards, p. 
Dispute, settle, p. 51. 
Dissension, arise, p. 69. 
Dissensions, vide Quarrels. 
Distance, great, p, 53. 
Disrended, of belly, p. 90. 
Distinction, make no, p. 33 : with- 
out — , p. 75, 1. 21. 
Distinguish, make no distinction 
between good and bad, p. 2 : — 
for knowledge, p. 48. 



Distracted through murder, p. 23. 

U. 13 and 23. 
Disturbance, p. 2 : — aboat trifle, 

p. 3,1. 1 : raise — , p. 20. 
Do for, a person, p. 61, 11. 19 and 

20 : — , kiU, p. 64. 
Doe, rouse sleeping, p. 38 : die — 's 

death, p. 66 : biting — , p. 57. 
Doffgerel, p. 31. 
Doleful, appearance, p. 80. 
Dominion, p. 42 
Done with, p. 76 : done, some time 

or other, p. 99 : vide Finished. 
Don't, p. 24, 1. 19. 
Door, shut when steed is stolen, 

p. 77 : lay at the — of, p. 79. 
Dotard, p. 46, 1. 12. 
Double-faced, insincere, p. 84, 1. 4. 
Down to (in wrestling), p. 92. 
Drag, of time, p. 11, 11. 16 and 17. 
Draught, dnnk at a, p. 37 : drini 

at one — , p. 40, 1. 16. 
Dread, vide Fear and Terror : live 

in — of, p. 100. 
Drink, at a draught, p. 37 : — 

at one draught, p. 40, 1. 15 : — 

blood, p. 78. 1. 31 : — or ©at, p. 

91,11. 13 and 14. 
Drinking, belly to become a drum, 

p. 90. 
Drive out, p. 64, 
Drowning man and straw, pp. 14 

and 27. 
Drum out, p. 54 : — (of belly), p. 

90. 

Drunk on a drop, p. 19. 

Drunkenness, disappear suddenly, 
p. 89. 

Dumb, be, from fear, astonish- 
ment, p. 13. 1. 20 : p. 72, 1. 23 

Dun, to, p. 68. 

Dupe, p. 58. 

Dust, throw id the eyes, p. 4 ; 
*' kick up the — ,'* p. 20 : cast 
— on head, p. 21, 1. 27 : — 
(man), p. 21, 1. 30 : join the — 
(die), p. 21, last line. 



E 



Ears, set people by the, p. 3 : — 
sounding p. 54 : catch hold of 
— , p. 54 : deafened — , p. 64 : 
prick up — , p. o6 : set by the — , 
p. 86. 

Ease, be at, p. 61 : get — , p. 61: 
at one's — , p. 73. 



109 



Easy, taak, p. 6 : very — , p. 84, 1. 

13 : ■— matter, p. 98. 
Eat, little, p. 11: — one up, p. 

67 : — up. pp. 67 and 73, 1. 18 : 

— or drink, p. 91, li. 13 and 14 : 
to begin to — , p. 96. 

Eavesdrop, p. 62. 

Ecstacy, p. 20. 

Educate a fool, p. 68. 

Education, bad, p. 62. 

Effect on, take, p. 64, 1. 8. 

Effects, requisites, p. 37. 

Effort, to please, p. 13, 1. 2 : slight 

-. P 94. . 
Elasticity, lose one's, p. 19. 
Elbow, to, p. 30. 
Embezzle, p. 64 : to — , p. 96 : 

p. 97. 
Embraoe, p. 61 : to — , p. 70 : 

p. 71,11. 1 to 4. 
Embroider, p. 69. 
Emphasis, p. 40. 
Empty promises, p. 31, 1. 14. 
Encounter, p. 18; — attdderUy, p. 

26. 
Encouraged, p. 60. 
Encumbrance, to bear, p. 70. 
Endear oneself to, p. 18. 
Enemies, surrounded by, p. 6 : far 

from — , p. 89, 11. 8 and ' 4. 
Enemy, secret, p 7 : deadly — , 

pp. 16 and 23 : — to disorder, 

p. 43 : — to sense, p. 46, 11. 18, 

23 and 27. 
Enmity, p. 24, 1. 6 : stir up — , 

pp. 63 and 77, 11. 19-23. 
Engage on a business, p. 96. 
Enjoy, society of , p. 43 : — free, 

p. 80, 1. 1. 
Enjoyment marred, p. 41, 1. 16. 
Enraged, become, p. 4. 
Ensnare in love, p. 27. 
Enterprising, p. 82. 
Enticing words, p. 90. 
Entrap a greenhorn, p. 1. 
Entreaty to. p 94. 
Entwine i, be, p. 68. 
Enunciated, can*t be, p. 30. 
Envy, cause, pp. 4 and 2.5 : object 

of — , p. 89, U. 19 and 22. 
Equality, to cdaim, p. 96. 
Escape, to, p. 10 : — death or 

danger, p. 22.1. 26: — memory, 

p. 23 : — scottfree, p. 43, 1. 1 : 

— death, p. 72. 
Estimation, fall in the, p. 89. 
Estranged, p. 24. 
Eunuch, p. 61. 



European, live like, p. 42. 

Evade, doing, p. 11 : pp. 62 and 69. 

Everybody, p. 69. 

Every other day, p. 71. 

Evil, chatter, of. p. 62 : — eye, 

p. 89 11. 26* and 27. 
Exactly, like, p. 46 : — as it was, 

p. 98 : ^- the same, p. 99. 
Exalted, to be, p. 36. 
Example, vide Follow. 
Excess, p. 68, 1. '. 
Exercise, religious, p. 93. 
Exert one-elf. p. 31, 1. 29. 
Expectation, of, no, p. 33. 
Expense, be put to, p. 32 : at the 

— of another, p. 80 : occur — in 

poverty, p. 82. 
Experienced, ups and downs, p. 

36 : — traveller, p. 73. 
Explanation of explanation, p. 98. 
Expression, evil, p. 11 : holy — , 

p. 11. 
Extend business, p. 94. 
Extinguish a lamp, p. 70, 11. 10 

and 11. 
Extol, p. 45. 
Eye, of, take the, p. 89. 
Eyes, operate on, p. 4. 
Eyesore to, p. 65. 



Face, not look in the, shame, p. 
4: to — , p. 18: dirty — , p. 
36 : slap the — , p 43 : with 
what — , p 69 : — to — , p. 66, 
last line : come — to — with, 
p. 80, 11. 12 and 28 : a wory — , 
p 83 : not the — to, p. 84. 

Ffikotory, start a, p. 62. 

Fade, to, p. 80. 

Fail when compared, p. 80. 

Fair without, p. 43. 

Fairs and shows, p. 86. 

Faithful, to be, p. 90. 

Faithless, p. 44. 

False, tcdes, tell, p. 64 : — accusa- 
tion, p. 88. 

Fcuniliar, too, p. 36, 11. 4 and 5 ; 
p. 36, 1. 12 : seems — (face), p. 
43 : to make — , p. 84. 

Family, old, p. 11, 1. 7: establish 
— , p. 74. 

Famous, make oneself, p. 37 : be 
— , p. 44. 

Fancy, take the, p. 89. 

Faqir, vide Celibate. 

Far off, pp. 64 and 66, 1. 25. 



110 



Fcurthings, count, p. 62. 
Fast, run, go, p. 48. 
Fastidious, p. 81, U. 7 and 8. 
Fasting stomach, on a, p. 91. 
Fasts, omission, make up for, p. 

61,1.30. 
Fat man, p. 59. 
Fate, awoke, p. 38. 
Fault, find, p. 36 : to attribute 

the — , p. 79. 
Faults, of deed and word, p. 64, 

1. 5. 
Favour, out of, p. 31, 1. 7 : in — , 

p. 36, 1. 29 : remove from — , p. 

89 : lose — , p. 89. 
Favourite, a, p. 83 : — with, p. 87. 
Fear, lose one's head from, p. 21 : 

p. 23, 11. 10 and 19: — and 

goose-flesh, p. 30: — , change 

colour, p. 44, 1. 18: pale from 

— , p. 49: pp. 53, 60 and 78. 
Feed on morsels of — , p. 16. 
Feel not words, p. 64, 1. 17. 
Feelings, to hurt, p. 25: relieve 

— , pp. 4; 25.11. 9, 11, 14; 46 

and 47 : to wound — , p. 86. 
Feet, kiss the, p. 50: plant — 

firmly, p. 60. 
Feign, pp. 32 and 38, 1. 8. 
Fervour, vide Zeal. 
Fettered, to be, p. 9, 11. 2 and 3. 
Fever-pains, p. 94. 
Fickle, pp. 56, 1. 1, 69 and 74. 
Field vacant, p. 85. 
Fig, flower of the wild, p. 72. 
Fight, get ready for, p. 78, 1. 1. 
Fighting and scratching, p. 91, 1. 

5. 
Fill to brim, p. 84. 
Filth, p. 72, 1. 26. 
Fingers itch to, p. 95. 
Finuih him off, p. 51, 11. 19 and 20 
Finished, to be, p. 51 : p. 67 : — 

with, p. 76, 1. 27. 
Fire, and burnt child, p. 10 : — 

and fireplace, p. 19 : fireplace 

and — , p. 19: — and fiying 

pan, p. 85. 
Fish, flesh, nor fowl, vide Fowl. 
Fist, vide Strike : strike with the 

— , p. 95 : use the fists, p. 95. 
Fisticuffs, p. 75. 
Fix, a, p. 91, 1. 24. 
Flat-faced, p. 44, 1. 4 : — nosed, 

p. 86, 1. 21. 
Flatterer, gross, p. 22. 11. 16, 18 

and 19 : p. 23. 
Flaw, p. 49. 



Flee in battle, p. 12, 1. 31. 

Flesh, fowl nor herring, vide Fowl. 

Flighty, vide Oad-about (p. 75). 

Flinch from, to, p. 97. 

Fly high, p. 3, 1. 4. 

Follow, vide Example : — in steps 

of, p. 50 : — blindly, p. 96, !. 

21. 
Folly, stop, p. 46. 
Fool, to make a, p. 1 : be made 

a — , p. 3 : — boaster, p. 8 . 

p. 46, last line and note : a — . 

p. 53 : educate a — , p. 68 : vide 

Blockhead. 
Foolish, look, pp. 1 and 84 : — 

and old, p. 34: p. 45, U. 5. 

14, 18, 21, 23 and 27 : — dotard. 

p. 45, 1. 12. 
Foot, have one in the grave, p. 

10. 
Footsteps, follow in, p. 50, vide 

Example and Follow. 
Fop, old, p. 39. 

Force, come into, p. 46 : — to ac- 
cept, p. 70 : use — , p. 100. 
Forehead, broad of, p. 59. 
Forget, never to, p. 4 : to — , p. 

21,1. 17. 
Forgotten, shelved, pp. 43 and 44, 

11. 1 and 2 : revive — quarrel. 

etc., p. 49 : dead and — , p. 81. 
Form, take, p. 43. 
Fortunate, become, p. 13, 1. 27 : 

p. 33, 11. 18 and 21. 
Fortune, change, of, p. 51, 11. 1, 2 

and 7 : trick of — , p. 51, 1, 4 : 

— favoured me, p. 61, 1. II. 
Foul within, p. 43. 
Found out, p. 52, 1. 4. 
Fowl-flesh, nor herring, p. 91, 1. 20. 
Fragile, p. 9. 
Frank speech, p. 83. 
* Fraud,' a. p. 79,1. 1. 
Fraudulently, vide Obtain. 
Free, be, p. 65 : — with his hands. 

p. 96. 
Frequent, p. 30, 1. 12. 
Fresh and healthy, look, p. 36. 
Friend, be disappointed in, p. 25, 

1. 5 : long-absent — , p. 58 : 

selfish — , p. 72, 11. 20 and 22 : 

intimate — , p. 100: vide In- 
timate. 
Friendly, be, p. 68. 
Friends, p. 5 : intimate — , pp. 24 

and 101 : make — , p. 41 : bosom 

— , p. 47, 1. 4. 
Friendship, a troublesome, p. 7. 



Ill 



Frown, to, p. 7, 11. 29 and 30; pp. 
14 and 86, U. 19 and 27. 

Frozen to the spot, fear, astonish- 
ment, p. 13. 

Frustrate, p. 9 : — plan, p. 24. 

Frying-pan and fire, p. 85. 

Funeral ceremonies, p. 72. 

Fuss, about trifle, p. 3, 1. 1: make 
a — ,pp. 31, L 26, and 34: p. 52, 
11. 17, 23, 24 and 25: vide Com- 
motion. 

G 

Oad about, pp. 68 and 75 
Oain, or loss, no, p. 79. 
Galley-slave, p. 63. 
Gallows, respite at, p. 20. 
Garrulity, p. 37, 1. 25. 
Gaze, lovingly, p. 4: — at, p. 15. 
Generous, p. 59 : to be — , p. 95. 
Get, on with, p. 49: — out of 

order, p. 59 : — hold of, p. 96, 

last line, and vide Obtain. 
*• Ghost," keep a, p. 56, 1. 13. 
Gird up loins, p. 61, IL 19, 32 and 

p. 78. 
Girded, p. 61. 
Glare, p. 76 : vide Anger: to — , p. 

92. 
Glow, red, of sunset, p. 40, 11. 19 

and 21. 
Gnash the teeth, p. 57. 
Gnat, strain at a, p. 70. 
Go away, p. 99. 
Gobble up, pp. 96 and 97. 
God keep him, p. 100. 
God's name, to shout, p. 98. 
€k>ne clean, p. 43. 
Good-bye, say, p. 23. 
Gooee-fleeh, p. 30. 
Gossip, p. 41 : — evil, p. 52. 
Gossiping, p. 68, U. 2 and 4. 
Grand-mother, teach, p. 38. 
Grapple with difficulty, pp. 44 and 

45, L 11. 
Grdas grow under one's feet. 
Grateful, p. 36, 1. 3 : to be — , p. 

71. 
Gratitude, evince, p. 71. 
Grave, one foot in the, pp. 10 and 

49 : rise from — , p. 50 : on the 

brink of the — , p. 72. 
Greatness, short-lived, p. 27. 
Greenhorn, pp. 1 and 58, 1. 6. 
Grey-haired, p. 65. 
Gxiefy take to one's bed through, 

p. 2 : — , (cast dust on hei^), 

p. 21 : — , remind one of old, 



pp. 30, last line and 31, L 1 

p. 34: to solace — , p. 47 

press the heart in — , p. 60 

p- 64, last line : p. 94. 
Grieve, p. 24, 1. 20 : to—, p. 60. 
Grieved at a death, p. 24, 11. 1 and 

3. 
Grimalkin, p. 41. 

Grind, p. 10 : — the teeth, p. 57. 
Grizzled, vide Grey. 
Groan, to, p. 100. 
Grope, to, p. 14. 
Ground, sink into, from shame, 

p. 40. 
Gradge, harbour, p. 25. 
Grumble, of the belly, p. 3. 
Grumbling, of belly, p. 52. 
Grunt, assent, p. 98 : p. 100. 
Guard the tongue, p. 30, IL 22 and 

24. 
Guess, p. 1 , vide Estimate. 
Gulp down unwillingly, p. 32. 
Gulps, drink in, p. 47. 
C^yp8y, p. 22. 

H 



Hail, a curse, p. 10. 

Hair, unbrushed, etc., p. 35: — 
black, pp. 53 and 63 : grey — , p. 
65 : — splitting, p. 85 : — pul- 
ling and scratotong, p. 91. 

Hale and sound, p. 97. 

Hand, at, p. 36: lend a — , p. 94: 

— in hand, p. 96 : — to hand, 
from, p. 96 : vide Strike. 

Hands, raise (in prayer or salute), 
p. 93 : — (soiled from food), p. 
95: free with — , p. 96: to 
join — , p. 96 : to shake — , p. 
96 : vide Possession. 

Handwriting, unformed, p. 57. 

Hang about, p. 30, 1. 12. 

Happy, feverishly, p. 26: — in 
poverty, p. 64. 

Harass, p. 20. 

Harrassed by, to be, p. 25. 

Hard, — hearted, p. 10, 11. 23 and 
24 : — working, p. 54 : — 
words, p. 58 : — , strong, p. 78 : 

— fought, p. 81, 1. 27 : to be — 
up, p. 94. 

Harden the heart, p. 20. 
Hardships, suffer, pp. 58 and 59, 

1. 2. 
Harsh words, sufifer patiently, p. 

5 : to use — , p. 15. 
Harshly, to speak, p. 59. 
Hasty in going, p. 99. 



112 



Hatchet, bury, p. 43. 

Hate, to, p. 11 : — , knife, p. 20, 
1. 11. 

Haughty, vide Proud. 

Haunt, frequent, hang about, p. 
30, 1. 12. 

Haunted by a fear, p. 100. 

Hawks calling, p. 16. 

Head, young, old shoulders, p. 1 2 
lose one's — at elevation, p. 19 
lose one's — from fear, p. 21 
cast dust on — , p 21 : — to be 
turned, p. 34 : move the — , p. 
35 : — itch for slap, p. 35 : 
chop ofE — , p. 36 : bend the — , 
p. 36, 11. 3 and 6 : beat — to a 
jelly, p. 66, 11. 1 and 5 : to raise 
the — , p 68. 

Health, ask after the, p. 81. 

Heap up, p. 68. 

Hear somehow, p. 55. 

Heard, be, p. 72. 

Heart, harden the, pp. 20 and 60 : 
lose — , p. 24 : — - filled, p. 25 : 
— , die within one, p. 25 : — 
sink, p. 60 : wounded in — , 
p. 60 : to break — , p. 60 : — be 
pained or melt, p. 60 : — press 
in grief, p. 6f» : — ^leap with joy, 
p. 60 : — upset, p. 60 : to pierce 
the -- of words, p. 60, 11. 28, 30 
and 31 : — to beat, p. 60, U. 32 
and 34: ease one's — , pp. 60 
and 61 : satisfy — 's longing, 
pp. 60 and 61: — beat suddenly, 
p. 61 : — leap in the mouth, p. 
61, 11. 2 and 4: by — , p. 91 : 
get by — , p. 91 : — and soul, 
with, p. 98. 

Heat, great, p. 4. 

Heed, give, p. 54 : not to — , p. 
55 : take — to, p. 72 

Heels, show a clean pair, p. 91. 

Hell, go to (die), p. 49-. play — 
with, vide Devil. 

Help, to, p. 94. 

Helpless, as a child, p. 88 : become 
— , p. 94,1. 15: p. 94,1. 23. 

Hen, soaked, p. 8 : — pecked, p 
17,11. 9 and 10; p. 31,1 25. 

Here and there, rare, p. 22, 1. 5. 

Hesitate, pp. 40 and 97. 

Hidden, keep, p. 32. 

Hiding, where have you been — , 

p. 46, 1 18. 
High, life, p. 42 : — and low,' p. 

59. 
Hinder, p. 19. 



Hindu, plump, p. 57. 

Hoarse, to become, p 70. 

Hog-backed, p. 90. 

Hold up to ridicule, etc., p. 6. 

Holes, pick, p. 20. 

Holy look, p. 91. 

Home, turn out of, p. 73. 

Homeless, p. 26, 1. 21. 

Honour, by coming, p. 60, 1. 8 : — 

to be preserved, p. 76 : — to 

preserve, p. 87. 
Honoured, to be, p. 86. 
Hope, lose, p. 25. 
Hopes, dashed, pp 44 and 96. 
Horizon, clear, p. 81. 
Hornet's nest, stir up, vide 

Wasp's. 
Horse, vide Sleep, (p. 75, 1. 6). 
Horsemen and potter, p. 9. 
Horses, to breed, p. 66. 
Hospitably, to receive, p. 96. 
Host, a, p. 85, 1. 15. 
Hot, piping, p. 69 : — tempered, 

p. 86. 
House, lonely and oppressive, p. 

74 
Hubbub, p. 54, 1. 20. 
Hum and haw, to, p. 96 : p. 100. 
Humble, p. 72, 1. 30. 
Humbug, to, p. 25. 
Humiliate oneself, p. 14. 
Hunger, p. 12 : satisfy — , p. 12. 
Hungrily begin to eat, p. 96. 
Hungry, be, p. 3 : to be — , p. 12, 

IL 17 and 19 : very — , p. 51. 
Hurt, make jealous, p. 21, 1. 14 : 

— feelings, p. 25. 
Husband, p. 74 : — of sister, p. 

98. 
Hypercritical, to be, p. 6 : — 

friendhness, p. 84 : p. 98. 



* Id — moon of, p. 46, 11. 13 and 

18. 
Idea of, no, p. 33. 
Idle, at home, p. 10, 1. 8 : — 

about, p. 56 : be — , p. 82 : p. 94 : 

— and not work, p. 100 : vide 

Lazy. 
Idleness, p. 92. 
Idly, to sit, p. 94. 
Ignorance of, p. 95, 1. 20. 
Ignorant, be, p. 65 : — of, vide 
" Unacquainted. 
Ignore, not feel, p. 54, 11. 17 and 

20. 



113 



111, — disposed towards, pp. 26 

and 69, L 21 : — fortuned, p. 

39 : your — luok has come, p. 

39, U. 28 and 31 : speak — of 

dead, p. 49: — educated, p. 

62 : — feeling, p. 66 : talk — 

o£ dead, p. 81 : take — , p 81 : 

to look — , p. 83, U. 6 to 7 : — 

tempered, p 90. 
Illness, change colour, p. 44, 1. 18 : 

recover from — , p. 50 : vide 

Sickness. 
Imagine, can't, p. 46. 
Imaginings, vain, p. 23. 
Imitate, p. 44, 1. 15 
Immodest, bold, p. 26. 
Impatient (lose patience), p. 44. 
Imperfect language, p. 57. 
Imperious, p. 86, 1. 10. 
Impersonate, p. 32, 11. 27 etnd 29. 
Importuning, p. 70 
Impossibility, p. 10: try — .pp. 

37 and 80: p. 94: to attempt 

— , pp. 97 and 99. 
Impossible, almost, p. 16 : do what 

is — , p. 24 : p. 66, 1. 28. 
Impotent, p. 61. 
Impoverished p. 14. 
Impression, on, make, to, p. 5. 
Inactive, socJsed hen, p. 8. 
Inattentive, to be, p. 66, 11.6 to 

10. 
Incite by promises, vide Promises. 
Indude oneself with other, better, 

p. 9. 
Incompetent sloven, p. 71. 
Incongruous, pp. 8 and 16. 
Increasing, ever, p 26. 
Indelible, p. 90. 
Independent, be, p. 82. 
Indifferent, cold, p. 78. 
Indignity, treat with, p. 80, 11. 18- 

22. 
Inferiority, admit one's, p. 6. 
Infidels, to die, p. 49. 
Infirm, p. 80. 
Inform, to, p. 72. 
Information, dig out, p. 66. 
Innumerable, p. 85, 1. 15. 
Inopportune (before the time), p. 

43, 1. 8. 
Inquire, vide Ask. 
Inseparable, p. 76. 
Insincere, p. 84, 1. 4. 
Insomnia, p. 92 : vide Sleep. 
Instcmt, vtde Moment 
Instruction, \mder, p. 32. 
Intent on, p. 76. 



Interest, success due to, p. 37. 
Interested, self-, p. 21 : selfish — 

friend, p. 72, IL 20 and 22. 
Interests, selfish, p. 50. 
Interfere, meddle, p. 11 : — in, 

p. 24 : p. 95. 
Interrupt, to, p. 5. 
Interrupted, be, p. 66. 
Interruption (in continuity), p. 47, 

1. 5. 
Interval (in continuity), p. 47, 1. 5. 
Intervals, at, p. 30. 
Interview, obtain an, p. 92, 1. 2. 
Intimacy, p. 69. 
Intimate, p. 24 : — friends, pp. 41, 

74 and 78 : be — with p. 43 : 

vide Devoted and Friend. 
Intrigue, to, pp 32 and 49 : love 

—, pp. 33 and 77, 1. 18 : pp 34 

and 53, L 1 : p. 77, 11 19 to 23. 
Intruder, p. 22, L 9. 
Invalid, p. 74, 1. 23, vide Ailing. 
Itch, for slap, the head, p. 35 : — 

to do, p. 68 : to — to, p. 95. 



Jack in office, be in temporary 
office, p. 2. 

"Jackal." p. 23. 

Jaunt, a, p. 80. 

Jealous, feel, pp. 19 ; 20, L 1 ; 
24; 32 and 39, 1. 26 : to make 
— , p. 20, 1. 3 : — of good luck, 
p. 21, 11. 13 and 14. 

Jealousy, cause of, p. 55 : p. 61. 

Jelly, beat to, pp. 11; 67, U. 
24 and 26 ; and 86 : beat head to 
a—, p. 66, 11. 1 and 5. 

Jet-black, p. 53, 11. 16 and 18. 

Jinn, possessed by, p. 33. 

Joke, to, p. 98. 

Joking and jesting, p. 98^ 

Jolly fellow, p. 100. 

Jostie, to, p. 30. 

Joy, or anger, be beside oneself 
from, p. 1 : — not to be able to 
contain oneself, pp. 12 and 16, 
11. 6 and 8 : — (clap the thighs), 
p. 19 : die of — , p. 39 : p. 56 : 
heart leap with — , p. 60. 

Judge at sight, p. 89. 

Jumble, p. 72. 

Justice, p. 41. 



K 



Keep to, p. 99. 
Kerbala, p. 58. 



114 



Kick, to, p. 75. 

Kil], p. 51, U. 19 and 20: —a 

nuisance, p. 51, L 32 : to — , pp. 

54 and 97 : — disgraoefuUy, p. 

56 : — behead p. 69, L 1. 
Killed by sword, p. 14, 11. 2 and 4. 
Ejndnees, not amenable to, p. 39, 

1. 8 : blamed for doing a — , p. 

92,1. 11. 
Boss the feet, p. 50. 
Elnaok, p. 96. 
Knife, ready to, p. 20. 
Knot, nuptial, pp. 67 and 68. 
Knowledge, distinguish for, p. 48. 
Known, talked of, p. 27 : — by 

sight, p. 43. 
KoB^ black, p. 53. 



Laborious, p. 54. 

Laid up in bed, p. 10. 

Lamp, to extinguish, p. 70, 11. 10 
and 11. 

Lamp-black, p. 53. 

Language, murder, p. 15 : offen- 
sive — , p. 76. 

Late, of zeal, p. 6: to make — , 
p. 82. « 

£r3^Ai-play, p. 76. 

Laugh, carry off with a, pp. 6, 15 
and 98. 

Laughed at, be, p. 98. 

Laughing, mattsr, p. 98 : — stock, 
p. 98. 

Lay down £krms, p. 97. 

' Leize * at home, p. 10. 

Lazy, p. 67, 1. ^3: vide Idle. 

Leader, a, p. 36. 

Leam wisdom from one's mistakes 
or misdeeds, p. 1. 

Learning, under instruction, p. 32, 
1.7. 

Leave, won't, p. 36. 

Lend a hand, p. 94. 

Liar, an amusing, p. 8. 

Liberty, taking, p. 22, 1. 9. 

Lie, — after lie, p. 17, 1. 13 : — 
down, p. 61 : — down at full 
length, p. 77. 

Lies, heaps of, p. 17, 1. 14. 

Life, weary or reckless of, p. 16, 
11. 9 and 10 : despair of — , p. 
16, 1. 13 : — in danger, p. 16, 
1. 15 and p. 20: risk one's — , 
p. 35: — burdensome, p. 68: 
in — and death, p. 80 : new 
lease of — , p. 91. 



Light, make, of, pp. 6, 18, 66, 72 
and 99 : — handed, p. 33 : make 

— of words, p. 72 : — of the 
house (son), pp. 73 and 74, 1. 8 : 

— finguredness, p. 95 : very — 
(in weight), p. 97. 

Lightly, think, of, p. 66: treat — , 

p. 99. 
Like, exactly, p. 46. 
Liked, make oneself, p. 25, 11. 16 

and 26. 
Lingering in sickness, p. 46. 
Lips, seued, p. 30 : to lick the — , 

p. 100, 1. 14 : bite the — , p. 

100, 1. 15. 
Lisping of child, p. 47. 
Listen, attentively, p. 54, 11. 28 

and 29 : force to — , p. 66 : — 

to, p. 72. 
Live, miserably, p. 31 : — luxiori- 

ously, p. 70 : — like a prince, 

p. 91 : iide Abode. 
Livelihood, means of, p. 64. 
Loaded, to be, p. 76. 
Loaf, p. 27. 

Locust-like, p. 85, 1. 15. 
Logic, to chop, p. 82, 11. 32-36. 
Loins, go in the, p. 61 : gird up 

the — , p. 61, 11. 19 and 32, and 

p. 78. 
Loneliness, p. 93: vide Solitude 

and Sadness. 
Lonely, p. 15, 1. 8 : — and op- 
pressive, p. 74. 
Long, and tedious, p. 42, 1. 5 : — 

ago, p. 55, last line. 
Longing, to do, p. 68, 1. 11 : satisfy 

—-, p. 77. 
Look, not to, in face, shame, p. 

4 : — sideways at, p. 62 : — in 

on your way, p. 65. 
Lose, head at elevation , p. 19: 

— heart, p. 24 : — from one's 
pocket, p. 69. 

Loot, vide Plunder. 

Lot of, fall to the, p. 89, 1. 18. 

Lottery, p. 13. 

Love, full in, p. 4 : — devotedly, 

p. 10 : — intrigue, pp. 33 and 

77 : be in — , p. 38. 
Lubber, p. 71. 
Luck, to turn, p. 68 : — , turn for 

good, p. 89, 11. 14 emd 16 : — to 

be on one's side, p. 89, 1. 17 : fall 

to the — , p. 89, 1. 18. 
Lucky, p. 51, 11. 8 and 9. 
Lucre, filthy, p. 95. 
Lust, to satisfy, p. 69. 



115 



Lustre, to lose, p. 80. 

Lute aad buffido = swine and 

pearls, p. 8. 
Luxuriant, p. 97. 
Luxuriously, live, p. 91, 1. 2. 
Luxury, Uve in, p. 70. 

M 

Mad, go, p. 14: — with rage, p. 
42, IL 1 and 3 : — from anger » 
p. 47 : p. 82. 

Man, stout and black, p. 1. 

Manage to get hold of, p. 96. 

Manly, p. 61. 

Mar, to, p. 90. 

Marksman, p. 6. 

Marry, p. 74. 

Master, of house, p. 74 : — of all 
trades, p. 97. 

Masturbation, p. 81, 1. 22. 

Matchless, almost, p. 40, 1. 1. 

Maternal affection, p. 63. 

Matter, easy, laughmg, p. 98. 

Meddle, interfere, p. 1 1 : p. 95. 

Meekly, suffer abuse, p. 40, 11. 7 
and 9 : bear — , p. 78. 

Meet to, call (polite), p. 92 

Meeting, never again, p. 64. 

Memory, put out of, p. 6 : escape 
— , p. 23 : troublesome — • p. 
25, L 19. 

Menses, pp. 5, 6 and 56. 

Mentioned by all, p. 30. 

Merry fellow, p. 48, I. 6. 

Mess, of, make a, p. 46 : — , jum- 
ble, p. 72. 

Messmate, p. 97. 

Milk on lip (reminder to youth), 
p. 26. 

Mind, poison the. pp. 54 and 55, 
1.5. 

Mine of sense, p. 45. 

Mingled, vide Commingled. 
Miracle, work a, p. 3 : vide Wonder. 
Mischief, make, pp. 53 and 77, U. 
19-23 : foil of — , p. 62: — 
maUng, p. 86, 1. 4. 
Mischievous, soaked cat, p. 8 : say 
something — , p. 40, 11. 22, 25 
and 26 : — , more than the 
devil, p. 42. 
Miser, p. 62, last line: vide Skin- 
flint. , 
Miserable, like cat and hen, p. 8, 

U. 5 and 8. 
Miserably, live, p. 31. 
Miserly, to be, pp. 17 and 94. 



Misery, reduce to, p. 10, 1. 16. 
Misfortune, unexpected blow, p. 2 
of people who bring — , p. 33 

— changed, p. 51, 11. 2 and 7 
to suffer — , p. 68. 

Misrule, p. 86. 

Miss, to (of blow, cut, etc.), p. 

93 : — blow, p. 95, 1. 1 : — 

one's aim, blow, etc., p. 95 and 

note. 
Bfistake at the outset, p. 7. 
Mistakes, leam wisdom from one's, 

p. 1. 
Mistress, take as, p. 74: the — ,. 

p. 74, 1. 19. 
Mock modesty, p. 32. 
Modesty, p. 26 : mock — , p. 32. 
Mole, — hills and mountains, p. 

14 : — , rare, p. 22, 1. 5. 
Moment, a, p. 4 : in a — , p. 5. 
Momentous, hard fought, p. 81. 
Money, squander, waste, p. 15 : 

one's own — , p. 67 : absorbed 

in — making, p. 90 : plenty of 

— , p. 95, L 28: vide Trash and 

Lucre. 
Mongolian-like, p. 44. 
Moon, of 'Id, p. 46, U. 13 and 18 : 

p. 58 : — , to rise, p. 66 : — 

light, p. 82. 
Morsels of, feed on, p. 15. 
Motive, feel suspicious of, p. 25. 
Moult, come out of the, p. 58. 
Mountains and mole-hUls, p. 14. 
Mournful appearance, p. 80. 
Mouth, to water, p. 84 : take th» 

word out of one's — , p. 84 : be 

convicted out of one s own — , 

p. 84. 
Move, not to, p. 12 : — the head, 

p. 35. 
Mumble, p. 96, 1. 26. 
Murder, a language, p. 15, 1. 6: 

— will out, p. 23, 11. 13, 23 and 
p. 34, L 26. 

Murdered, be, lit. and met,, p. 23. 
Mystery, p. 13. 
Mysticism, p. 39. 

N 

Naff, p. 36, 1. 9. 

Naus, to pare or cut, p. 86. 

Naked, p. 90. 

Name, make a, p. 37, IL 16 ; p. 88, 
IL 5 and 6-8 and p. 98, 1. 30 : give^ 
a bad — , p. 87 : to — (chSd),. 
p. 88: destroy one's good — ^ 



116 



p. 88 : gain an ill — , p. 98, L 
33. 

Natural death, p. 85 : vide Death. 

Nature, second, p. 73. 

Need, time of, p. 93. 

Needy, p. 24 : vtde Hard up. 

Negligence, sleep of, p. 23. 

Negotiations, p. 64. [p. 2. 

Neither one thing nor the other, 

Nero fiddling, p. 73, 1. 30. 

News, p. 69. 

Nickname, to, p. 88. 

Nigger-black, p. 63, 11. 16 and 18. 

Night, weary, p. 1 1 : sit up ail — , 
p. 31. 

No, p. 35, 1. 16. 

Noise, make, p. 3, 1. 3 : — (of 
boys), p. 26 : — , tumult, p. 47, 
1. 21 : great — , p. 54 : — and 
confusion, p. 72. 

Noised abroad, p. 62. 

NomincJ, styled, p. 83. 

Nominally, p. 88. 

Nominated, p. 88. 

Non-existent, reure, p. 72, 1. 15. 

Non-plussed, to be, p. 34. 

Nonve(m riche, opposite to, p. 11. 

Nose, thin delicate, p. 34 : fine — , 
p. 86 : coarse — , p. 86 : aquiline 
— , p. 86 : fiat — , p. 86, 1. 21 : 
to follow one*s — , p. 87, 1. 13 : 
to rub one's — , p. 87, 11. 15-16 : 
speak through one's — , p« 87, 
1. 17. 

Nothing, at all, p. 50: worth — , 
p. 66 : p. 72 i — to gain or 
lose, p. 79 : for — , p. 101. 

Notorious, as the Devil, p. 87 : 
become — , p. 88: — and dis- 
graced, p. 90. 

Now and then, p. 56, 1. 3 and 
p. 68, 1 1. 

Nuisance, p. 36 : kill a — , p. 51. 

Numerous, very, p. 86, 1. 16. 

Nuptial knot, p. 67 : to tie — , p. 
68. 

O 

Obese, become, pp. 38 and 56 : 

vide Fat. 
Obieot, p. 47, 1 6. 
Obligations to, not to be under, p. 

82. 
ObstincMsy, overcome, p. 59. 
Obstinate, not to desist, p. 2 : p. 

16, 1. 14 : p. 34, 1 16 : p. 66. 
Obtain fraudulently, p. 94: to 

manage to — , p. 96. 



Obtained, be, p. 93. 

Offended, be, p. 14 : p. 59. 

Offending, avoid, p. 96. 

Offensive in speech, pp. 24 aod 83. 

Office, be in temporary, p. 2. 

Old, matters, rake up, p. 10 : — 
man, pp. 12 and 46, 1. 8 : — 
man near death, p. 22: — with 
out wisdom, p. 26: — man of 
seventy, p. 33 : — man opening 
youth, p. 39: — man with black 
hair, pp. 63 emd 63 : p. 91. 

Omission, sin of p. 51 : make ud 
for — , p. 51 , 11. 26, 28 and 30. 

Omit in writing, p. 63. 

One-eyed man amongst blind, p. 3. 

Onus, p. 34, 1. 24. 

Open-hearted, p. 69. 

Opeoly, p. 65, 11. 31 and 32. 

Operate on the eyes, p. 4. 

Oral, mysticism, p. 39. 

Order, out of, p. 59: — to be 
obeyed, p. 86. 

Ordinary, •' — people like us," 
p. 98 : p. 101 : vide Middling. 

Ornaments, without, p. 91. 

Ossa on Pelion, p. 91. 

Oval-faced, p. 56. 

Overhear, p 54. 

Overpower, to, p. 92: vide Defeat 
and Conquer and Down. 

Overpraise, p. 13, 1. 23. 

Overwork, p. 38. 

Owl, p. 1 : wooden — , p. 53. 



Pace with, keep, p. 50. 

Pack, full. p. 65. 

Packed of crowd, p. 13. 

Paid in full, p. 62. 

Pained in heart, p. 25, 1. 21. 

Pains (fever — ), p. 94. 

Pale from fear, p. 49. 

Pallor, p. 81. 

Palm, bear away, p. 49. 

Paltry, p 101, last line. 

Panic, vide Fear. 

Paralyzed, p. 94 

Parched, with thirst, p. 31 : — , 

of tongue, p. 38, 1 28. 
Pardon my faults, p. 64, 1. 5. 
Parrot, pp. 44 and 96 : — -like, 

pp. 44 and 85. 
Part, play, p. 32, 11. 27 and 29. 
Partiality, speak without, p. 22. 
Pass si >wly (of time), p 11. 
I'assion, fiy into a, p. 76. 



117 



Past, story of , p. 23 : — and gone, 

p. 76. 
Patch the sky, p. 3. 
Patience, lose, p. 44. 
Patiently, sofier hard words, p. 5 : 

p. 39. 
Patron, to be, p. 34. 
Pay, vide Debt : — up, vide Stump 

up. 
Peace, p. 41 : make — , p. 43. 
Pearls before swine, p. 8. 
Pelion on Ossa, p. 91. 
Pen, with one stroke of, p. 10]. 
Penniless, pp. 62 and 63. 
Penny wise, pp. 3 and 64. 
People, decent, all gone, p. 85 : 

common — , p 97. 
Peremptory, be, p. 41. 
Perfect, by practice, p. 96. 
Performance, poor in, rich in 

words, p. 6. 
Perplexity, be in, p. 40. 
Persecute, pp. 11 and 95. 
Persist, not to desist from, p. 2. 
Person, dangerous or poisonous, 

p. 6. 
Persuade, p. 65. 

Perverse, obstinate, p. 34, 1. 15. 
Pharaoh, proud as, p. 48. 
Pierce, of arrow, p. 13. 
Pigeon's milk, p. 72, 1. 16. 
Pig-headed, perverse, p. 34, 1. 15. 
Pipe, to (of birds), p. 44, 1. 8. 
Piping hot, p. 69. 
Pitch, touch and not be defiled, 

p. 63. 
Pitifal sight, p. 10. 
Pitfall, dig, p. 62. 
Pithy (of book), p. 24. 
Place, put yourself in, p. 61. 
Plagiarist, p. 66, 1. 13. 
Pkmi, bare, p. 69: — speech, 

p. 83. : -— answer, p. 83. 
Plan, to frustrate, p. 24 : con- 
coct — , p. 65. 
Plant, the feet firmly, p. 60: — 

thorns, p. 56, 1. 21. 
Play part of, p. 32, U. 27 and 29. 
Please, p. 13 : — one's parents, 

p. 60. 
Pkasore, get, p. 61. 
Pledge oneself, pp. 20 and 96. 
Plomp-faced Hindu, p 57. 
Plunder, vide Loot and Bob. 
Plundering, p. 78. 
Pocket, lose from one's, p. 69. 
Point, return to the, after digre8< 
sion, p. 97. 



Poison, a person's mind, pp. 54 

and 66, 1. 6 : — oneself, p. 57. 
Poisonous, or dangerous person, 

p. 6 : — words, p. 77. 
Polished (of persons), p. 22. 
Polly, pretty, p. 85. 
Poor but che^, p. 48, 1. 6 : — 
spirited, p. 57 : — and spend- 
thrift, p. 78, 1. 6 : vide Paltry. 
Popular, p. 46, 1. 18. 
* Portion,' p. 93. 
Possessed by Jinn, p. 33. 
Possession of, full into the, p. 94. 
Potter, and Horsemen, p. 9: to — 

about, p. 34. 
Poverty, sunk in, p. 82 : occur ex- 
pense in — , p. 82. 
Power, short-lived, p. 27 : — 
under another's, p. 94 and vide 
Helpless. 
Powerful, can do me good or ill 

p. 33, 1. 17. 
Practice, put in, p. 46. 
Practise, vide Perfect. 
Praise, oneself, p. 1 : p. 13: — 
loudly, p. 44, 1. 8 : pp. 55 and 
60 : ~ of self, p. 86 : to — , p. 
93, 11. 8 and 9. 
Praised, to be, p. 14. 
Praises of. sing the, p. 71. 
Pranks, play, p. 94, 1. 21, vide 

Artifices and Tricks. 
Pray for, p. 23. 
Prayer, omission, make up for, p. 

51, 1. 28: vide Hands. 
Precautionary measures, too early, 

p. 9. 
Pregnant, p. 10, 1. 1 and p. 27. 
Prematurely, die, p. 17. 
Present, at, p. 36. 
Presume on another's protection, 

p. 66. 
Pretence of riches, p. 83. 
Pretend, p. 32. 
Pretender, to wisdom, p. 48 : a — , 

p. 79, L 1. 
Prettjr Polly, p. 86. 
Previiil on, p. 65. 
Prevaricate, pp. 2, 6, 49 and 73, 

I. 19. 
Prevented, be, p. 66. 
Price, go down in, p. 36. 
Pricked bladder, p. 41. 
Pride, p. 10. 
Prince, live like a, p. 91. 
Priase, a, p. 39: obtain — , p 4^. 

1. 24. 
Proclaim, p. 27- 



118 



Procrastinate, pp. 6, 43 and 79. 
Profess oneself true, p. 50. 
Progress, hinder, p. 19. 
Promise, p. 31, 1. 10: true to his 

— , p. 62 : make a — , p. 96. 
Promises, specious, pp. 6, 17, 33 

and 49 : empty — , p. 31, 1. 14. 
Proposition, assent to, p. 96. 
Prostitute, turn, p. 62 : — 's dis- 

dple, p. 64. 
Prostitution, p. 88. 
Protection of another, presume on, 

p. 66. 
Proud, to be, pp. 26 and 36 : 

p. 45 : — as Pharaoh, p. 48. 
Publicly, p. 90. 
Pull the strings, p. 4. 
Pulse, to stop, p. 88. 
Punish severely, pp. 2 cuid 67. 
Punished, p. 39, U. 28 and 31. 
Punishment, require, p. 35 : p. 

60. 
Puppet, dance, p. 4: p. 57. 
Purity, ceremonial, p. 93. 
Purse, empty, p. 67. 
Pursue, to, p. 76 : p. 95. 
Pushing, of people, p. 9, 1. 9 : — 

person, p. 74. 
Pussy, a poor, p. 68. 
Put off, p. 16. 

Q 

Quack, p. 46, 1. 4: to— , p. 65: 
p. 57, 1. 4. 

Quail, vide Butt. 

Quarrel, revive old, p. 49: stir 
up — , p. 61 : settle — , p. 61, 
1. 22 : seek a — , p. 77 : revive 
forgotten — , p. 81 : make to — , 
p. 86: vide Wrangle, Tiff and 
Words. 

Quarrels, p. 76. 

Quarrelsome, pp. 19 and 99. 

Question ? , p. 54. 

Quick, cut to the, p. 60. 

Quickly (snap of the fingers), p. 
18. 

Quiet, quiet (to angry person), p. 
47, 1. 12. 

Quill driving, p. 22. 

Quran, vide * Portion.' 



R 



Race for self, p. 89, 11. 29-31. 
Rage, mad with, p. 42, 11. 1 and 
3. 



Rain oats etnd dogs, p. 85. 

Raise hands, p. 93. 

Rake up, old matters, p. 10 : — a 

quarrel, p. 70. 
Rankle, to, p. 69. 
Rapidly, move, p. 48, 1. 10. 
Rare, pp. 22 and 72. 
Rate, abuse, p. 66, 1. 6. 
Read fluently, p. 48. 
Ready, to start, pp. 8 and 9 : get 

— too early, p. 9, L 22 : get — , 
p. 61,11. 19 and 32. 

Reason with, p. 26: for no special 

— , p. 101. 
Rebel, to, p. 34: p. 68. 
Rebuke, to, p. 79. 
Reckless of one's life, p. 16. 
Recoil on one's own head, p. 9, 1. 

25. 
ReooUection, keep in, p, 4. 
Recover, from sickness, p. II : — 

from shock, pp. 16 and 18. 
Recovery, after child-birth, p. 75 : 

— from sickness, p. 9 i 

Red, from anger, p. 4 : — of sun- 
set, p. 40, 11. 19 and 21. 

Reed, broken, p. 14. 

Refractory, p. 40. 

Refreshed, be, p. 16: p. 18. 

Refusal, flat, pp. 15 and 38 : — 
with thanks, p. 37. 

Regard, oease to, p. 4. 

Regret, p. 96 r to — , p. 96 : bite 
the Ups from — , p. 100. 

Rejoioe, p. 76, L 10. 

Relations, all, p. 99. 

Relationship, ties of, p. 23. 

Relatives, p. 5. 

Relieve, feelings by revenge, p. 1 1 : 

— one's feelmgs, pp. 26, 11. 9, 11 
and 14 ; 46 and 47. 

Religious duty, vide Duty. 
Reli^, drmk, p. 47. 
Remained, all that* p. 30. 
Remember, not to, p. 21. 
Reminder (a child), p. 86, L 23. 
* Remove ' a nuisance, p. 61,1. 32. 
Rend, to, met., p. 26. 
Renounce, pp. 93 and 96, last line. 
Repeat, like parrot, p. 44: — 

fluently, p. 48 : — things, p. 64 : 

to force to — , p. 97. 
Repent, eat dirt, p. 73. 
Repentance, p. 64, L 24. 
Reproach severely, p. 66. 
Reproof, a, p. 65. 
Reputation, leave a good, p. 88. 
Requisites, effects, p. 37. 



119 



Resembling closely, pp. 98 and 99. 

Resentment, feel, p. 26. 

Reserved, p. 73. 

Resigned, p. 39. 

Respite at the gallows, p. 20. 

Pest awhile, p. 61. 

Restless, p. 78. 

Restrain tears, p. 3. 

Resnrreotion, p. 52. 

Retaliation, long for, p. 38. 

Retire from service, p. 61. 

Retract, p. 30. 

Retnm quickly, p. 64 : — after 

digression, p. 97 : — goods to 

shop, p. 100. 
Revel, p. 81. 
Revenge, relieve feelings by, p. 

11 : satisfy — , p. 16. 
Revive old quarrel, p. 49. 
Rich, and poor, p. 59 : vide Well- 
off and Comfortable. 
Riches, pretence of, p. 83. 
Rid of , white elephant, p. 7, 1. 18. 
Ridicule, hold up to, pp. 6 and 

68 : p. 15 : hold np to — or 

disgrace, p. 17. 
Rise, of moon, p. 66. 
Risk one's life, p. 35. 
Risky, p. 13, 1. 28. 
Rival, nearly without, p. 40. 
Roach-backed, p. 80. 
Rob, vide Plunder and Loot. 
Rogue, p. 68 : cunning — , p. 69. 
Ropes of sand, p. 90. 
Rose-finch and Parrot, pp. 44 and 

96. 
Roses, live in a bed of, p. 70. 
Rou6, p. 82. 
Rough and tumble, a, p. 24 : p. 

85. 
Roughly, treat, p. 39. 
Rouse sleeping dogs, p. 38. 
Rout, p. 43, 1. 17. 
Pow, noise (of boys), p. 26. 
Rubbish, talk, pp. 5, 31 and 93; 

also vidi Chatter : p. 67. 
Rude speech, reproof to, p. 65 : 

p. 83. 
Rudely, to speak, p. 83. 
Ruin, rush on, p. 30 : — , waste, 

destroy, p. 46 : joyful in one's 

— , p. 73, L 30. 
Ruined, be undone, p. 13: — 

place, p. 21 : be — , p. 24, L 26 : 

— scattered, p. 41 : to be — , p. 

80. 
Rumour, p. 2 : spread a — , p. 8: 

start a — , p. 22. 



Run, about, to make to, p. 7, I. 
14: —away, pp. 91, 1. 16; 49, 
1. 2; 53, 89 and 97; also intfe 
Disappear and Flee. 

Rush on ruin, p. 30. 

S 

Sacrificed, to be, pp. 50 and 93, 1. 
6: be —for, p. 81. 

Sadness, p. 93 : vide Solitude and 
Loneliness. 

Sale, slcKik, p. 36. 

Salt, on woimd, pp. 16; 30, last 
line; 31,1. 1; and 57 : — and 
treachery (a curse), p. 90. 

Salutation, vide Hands. 

Sand, ropes of, p. 90. 

Satisfy anger or lust, p. 69. 

Saying, continually, p. 91, 1. 19: 
always — , vide Tongue. 

Scattered, p. 41. 

Scheme, to, p. 49. 

Schoolmaster (primary), p. 85. 

Scolding woman, pp. 16 and 99. 

Scot-fr^, p. 43. 

Scrape, get on into a, p. 32. 

Scratching and hair-pulling, p. 91 . 

Scrawl, a, p. 67. 

Screen, hunting, p. 26, 1. 26. 

SoufiSe, to, p. 96. 

Scylla and Charibdis, p. 91, 1. 24. 

Searching out, p. 58. 

Season, out of, to do something, 
p. 8 : in and out of — , p. 93 : 
deadly — , pu 98, 1. 33. 

Seat, not to leave one's, p. 12, last 
line. 

Second, vide Moment. 

Secrecy, great, p. 48. 

Secret, can keep, p. 12, i. 7 : can't 
keep — , p. 12, 1. 8 : — , be dis- 
closed, pp. 13 and 44: keep — , 
pp. 30, 11. 24, and 73 : — out, 
pn. 52 and 77, 1. 6 : p. 68 : vide 
Disclosed. 

Secrets, disclose, p. 6. 

See, pretend not to, p. 4. 

Self, interested, p. 21 : look after 
— , p. 50, L 3 : — praise, p. 85. 

Selfish, p. 47 : — friend, p. 72, 11. 
20 and 22. 

Selfishness, p. 89, 1L 29 and 31. 

Sell for what it will fetch, p. 5. 

Sense, mine of, p. 45. 

Senses, out of one's, pp. 34 and 99, 
n. 31 and 82 : come to — , pp. 
46; 00, L33andl00,U. l,4and 



120 



6 : drive out of one's — , p. 99, 
1. 30: lose the — , vide Wits. 
Mad, Cracked, etc 
Separation, p. 64, 1. 17. 
Septuagenarian, p. 33, 1. 23. 
Sepulchre, whitod, pp. 7)1. 6 ; and 

43. 
Servant, make to run about, p. 7, 
1. 14 : — , irate, saying of, p. 
39 : p. 90. 
Service, take, p. 39 : quit — , p. 

61. 
Settle, dispute, p. 51 : — quarrel, 

p. 61,1. 22. 
Sever at a blow, p. 52. 
Sexagenarian, pp. 34 and 45, 1. 12. 
Sh, to use these letters, p. 42. 
Shadow, afraid of, p. 10, 11. 27 and 

30. 
Shame, feel no, p. 3 : not look in 
the face for — , p. 4 : put to — , 
pp. 9 and 74 : p. 18 : show — , 
p. 36, 1. 3 : p. 39 : sweat from 
— , p. 40, 1. 10: sink into 
ground from — , p. 40, 1. 11: 
through shame, adv., p. 40, 1. 
12 : p. 69, IL 28 and 29. 
Shameleas, p. 8, 11. 17 and 18. 
Shape, take, p. 43. 
Sharp, vide Cute. 
Shave, to, p. 18. 
Sheep-like, blindly, p. 8. 
Sheep's, clothing, wolf, p. 41 ; — 

oy©s> P' 62. 
Shelf, put on, pp. 43 emd 44, 11. 1 

and 2. 
Shelved, pp. 43 and 44, 11. 1 and 2. 
Shi' ah warning, p. 85. 
Shirk, to, p. 17. 
Shirker, p. 54. 
Shock, recover from, pp. 16 and 

18: receive a — , p. 37. 
Short, in, p. 51. 
Short-lived power, p. 27, 1. 13. 
Shoulder, lend a, p. 55. 
Shout, at the top of one's voice, p. 

70 : — like dervish, p. 98. 
Show, off, p. 41 : make a — (live 
well), p. 42, 1. 23: specious—, 
p. 49: make a — of riches, p. 
83. 
Shows and fairs, p. 86. 
Shrewd, p. 76. 

Shun, to, p. 63, 11. 7, 8 and 9. 
'Shut up,' p. 31. 
Sibilants, to use, p. 42, 1. 14. 
Sickness, recover from, p. 11: 
wasted from — , p. 27, 1. 26 : 



lingering in — , p. 46 : recover 
from serious — , p. 50 : recovery 
from — , p. 91 : vide Illness. 
Sigh, deep, p. 32. 
Sign, to, p. 42, 1. 30. 
Signs, p. 37. 
Sight, pitiful, p. 10: know by — . 

pp. 42 and 43. 
Silence, p. 22, I. 22 : keep — , pp 
31,11. 12 and 13; 38; and 83, II 

13 and 15. 
Silent, keep, pp. 25, 71 and 83: 

p. 68. 
Silly, old man, p. 1 : vide Gad 

about (p. 75). 
Simple mystery, pp. 13 and 14, L 

16. 
Simpleton, p. 6. 
Sin of omission, p. 61 : make np 

fop — , p. 51, 11. 26, 28 and 30.' 
Sink into ground, shame, p. 40 : - 

of the heart, p. 60. 
Sister's husband, p. 98. 
Sit, still, p. 12: — up all night, 

p. 31, 1. 20 : — idly, p. 94. 
Sixty-years old, p. 34. 
Skeleton, become a, p. 38, 11. 26 

and 28. 
Skies, extol to, p. 49. 
Skin-flint, p. 82. 
Skrimshanker, p. 54. 
Slain, be, p. 54. 
Slap, head itch for, p. 35 : cuff — . 

p. 35 : — the face, p. 43. 
Slaughter, p. 59 : — in battle, p 

66. 
Slave, a, p. 63, 1. 22; to — , p. 63, 

1. 23 : work like a — , p. 63, 1. 

24 : — of custom, p. 77, 11. 11 

and 14. 
Slay, to, p. 79. 
Sleep, at ease, p. 10 : — of neg 

ligence, p. 23 : — and snake, p. 

32 : turn over in — , p. 68, 11. 19 

and 21 : ' — on a bare bedstead,' 

p. 65 : — soundly, pp. 74 and 

81 : — without anxiety, p. 75 : 

— to be dissipated, broken, p. 

92, 11. 19 and 23 ; — one's fiU. 

p. 92, 1. 22 : not to — , p. 92, IL 

24 8Uid 26 : drunk from — , p. 

92, 1. 27 : vide Insomnia. 
Sleeping dogs, rouse, p. 38. 
Sleepy, p. 92, 11. 26 and 27. 
Sleight of hand, pp. 95 and 96. 
Slip away, p. 62. 
Sloth, p. 23, 1. h 



121 



Sloven and inoompetent, p. 71. 

Slowly, move, p. 19. 

Slur, p. 92 : vide Brand and Stigma. 

Sly rogue, p. 68. 

Smart, cunning, p. 19. 

Smattering, p. 56. 

Smell, bad, p. 81. 

Smiling face, p. 98. 

Smoke away, p. 37. / 

Smuggle, p. 73. 

Snail, p. 22. 

Snake, cherish in one's bosom, p. 
2 : — and sleep, p. 32 : trail of 
— , p. 77 : beat trail of — , p. 79. 

Snap of the fingers (quickly), p. 
18. 

Snore, to, p. 22. 

So much the better, p. 48. 

Soaked cat, mischievous, p. 8. 

Sob, to, pp. 33 and 74. 

Sober, become, p. 89, 1. 4. 

Sociable, p. 100. 

Society, enjoy a person's, p. 43. 

Soft-hearted, p. 85. 

Soften (a person's heart), p. 85. 

Soiled, vide Dirty. 

Solace grief, p. 47. 

Sold for a song, p. 63. 

Solitary place, p. 98, 11. 27 to 29. 

Solitude, p. 93 : vide Loneliness 
and Sadness. 

Somersault, p. 52, 1. 2. 

Something or other, p. 58. 

Some time or other, pp. 56 and 99, 
1.26. 

Sometimes one thing, 1 _ t-e i a 

Sometimes the other, ] P* ^^' ^' ** 

Somewhere, strange, p. 64 : — or 
other, p. 66. 

Son, pp. 73 and 74, 1. 8. 

Song, sold for a, p. 63. 

Sop, throw a, p. 84 

Sore, won't heal, p. 7. 

Soreness of mind, p. 46. 

Sorrow, p. 53 : cause — , p. 60 : 
restrain one's — , p. 60. 

Sovereignty, a fleeting, p. 37. 

Space forbids, p. 19, 1. 13. 

Spain, castles in, p. 23. 

Speak, abominably, p. 15 : — 
truly, p. 22, 1. 29 : — not a word, 
p. 31: — harshly, p. 59: — 
plainly, p. 65 : — rudely, p. 83: 
openly, p. 83: — low, p. 84: — 
crossly, p. 86 : — affectedly, p. 
89. 
Specious, p. 43, I. 25: — promises, 
p. 49: p. 71,1. 12. 



Speech, check oneself in middle of, 

p. 5 : a bad — , p. 31 : poor — , 

p. 57. 
Speechless, to become, p. 6. 
Speed, fuD, p. 13 : go at full — , p. 

44, 1. 8. 
Speedy return, p. 64. 
Spent clean, p. 43. 
Spiced words, vide Words. 
Spoil, sport, plan, etc., p. 66, 11. 

21 and 22: to — , pp. 73, L 1 

and 80, 11. 18-22. 
Spoiled, become, p. 73, 1. 9. 
Spoilt, vide Vanish. 
Spoke in wheel, hinder, p. 19, 1. 7. 
Sponger on wife's family, p. 37. 
Sprawl about idly and not work, p. 

100. 
Sprinkle salt on wound, pp. 30, last 

line, and 31, 1. 1. 
Spurn, p. 75. 

Squander, pounds and save farth- 
ings, p. 3 : — in poverty, p. 78. 
Squandered, money, p. 15. 
Stable door and steed, p. 77. 
Staggered, p. 90. 
Stalking-horse, p. 26, 1. 26. 
Stand, to, p. 65, 1. 16. 
StchT, with white, p. 33. 
Stare, to, p. 3 : — at celling (be 

near death), p. 4. 
Stark-naked, p. 90, U. 29-30. 
Start, ready to, pp. 8 and 9 : — a 

business, p. 62. [and 26. 

Startle, by tale, p. 40, 11. 22, 25 
Starve, to, p. 58. 
State, become bad, p. 20, 1. 19. 
Stature like cypress, p. 37. 
Stay at home, vide Idle. 
Steady old boy!, p. 47, 1. 12. 
Steal, to, p. 96. 

Stench, not to endure the, p. 87. 
Stick, to, vide Bird-lime : — to, 

pp. 11, 1. 6; 15; 33; 36,1. 1; 

and 99: — to a person, pp. 68; 

70, 11. 22 and 27 ; and 95. 
Stiff, to be, pp. 13 and 53. 
Stigma, p. 92 : vide Slur and Brand. 
Still, stock-still, p. 19. 
Stingy, p. 71. 
Stock-still, become, p. 19. 
Stomach, on an empty, p. 91. 
Stone unturned, leave no, p. 31. 
Stop, don't say so, p. 22. 
" Stop-tongue," p. 21. 
Store, to, p. 41 , 1. 2. 
Stories, make up, p. 49, 11. 8 and 

11. 



122 



Storm, mckke a, p. 31, 1. 26. 
Story, of past, p. 23 : tell a long 

— , p. 77. 
Stout blaok man, p. 1. 
Straightforward, not, p. 76. 
Straitened, vide Hard up and 

Needy. 
Strange place, p. 64. 
Stranger, no longer, p. 92. 
Straw and drowning, pp. 14 and 

27. 
Straws, gather (mad), p. 14. 
Stress, p. 40. 

Strife ending in bloodshed, p. 23. 
Strike, out, p. 52, I. 13 : — the 

mind, p. 79, 1. 22 : — with 6st, 

p. 95 : — ab, p. 96. 
Strings, pull the, p. 4. 
Striped, p. 71. 
Strive, at weary tctsk, p. 1 1 : — 

painfully, p. 23, U. 7 and 11. 
Striving, p. 47, 1. 6. 
Stroke, to, p. 96 : — of pen, p. 

101. 
Strong, hard, p. 78. 
Struggle, together, to, p. 59 ; to — 

much, p. 94. 
Struggling together, p. 76. 
StufiQng, superfluous, p. 23, I. 5. 
Stump .up, p. 86. 
Stupid, become, p. 73 : p. 76. 
Styled, nominal, p. 83. 
Subdue, p. 35. 
Subdued, to be, p. 36. 
Submerged, p. 16. 
Submission, p. 36. 
Succeed in difficult matter, p. 3, 

1.7. 
Success, crowned with, p. 36 : — 

by interest, p. 37 : rejoice at — , 

p. 75, 1. 10. 
Successful, be, p. 8. 
Succession, in quick, p. 13. 
Suffer, all alike undistinguished, 

p. 2: — hard words patiently, 

p. 5 : — much, p. 23, 11. 7 and 

11: — abuse meekly, p. 40, 11. 

7 and 9 : — hard^ips, pp. 68 

and 69, 1. 2. 
Suicide by poison, p. 67, last line. 
Sulk, to, p. 67. 
Sulky, p. 83, 11. 21 and 25. 
Sum, up, to, p. 51 : lump — , p. 

101. 
Sumptuously, to live, p. 91, 1. 2. 
Sunset, p. 40, 11. 19 and 21. 
Superb, p. 47, 1. 22. 
Superfluous stuffing, p. 23. 



Superiority, acknowledge, p. 50 : 

to admit another's — , p. 78. 
Support, to, p. 20 : unsubstantial 

— , p. 53 : lose one*s — , p. 61. 
Supporter, to lose, p. 12, 11. 26 and 

29. 
Surpass, the devil, p. 42: p. 49: 

— in evil, p. 54. 
Surrounded by enemies, p. 6, 11. 

10 and 26. 
Susceptibilities, to hurt, p. 86. 
Suspicious, feel, p. 25. 
Suzerainty, p. 63. 
Swallow unwillinirly, p. 32. 
Swear, lightly, p. 60, 1. 17 : — not 

to do, p. 60 : not enough to — 

by, p. 50 : vide Oath. 
Swearing, mutual, p. 61. 
Sweat, from shame, p. 40 ' to — , 

p. 63, 1. 24. 
' Sweated,* p. 63. 
Sweep clean, p. 43. 
Sweetheart, enjoyment with, p. 

81. 
Swell, up, p. 38 : to — , p. 66. 
Swept away, p. 24. 
Swift, be, p. 99, U. I and 10. 
Swim, to, p. 94. 
Swine and pearls, p. 8. 
Sword, killed by the, p. 14: — 

play, p. 78 : put to the — , p. 

78, 1. 19. 

T 

Tackle difficulty, p. 44. 

Tactless, a ** stop-tongue," p. 21. 

Taken in, p. 49. 

Tale-bearing, credulous to, p. 66. 

Tales, tell, p. 64. 

Talk, much, pp. 26 and 81 : — too 
much, pp. 36 and 66 : worry by 
— , p. 37 : child beginning to — , 
p. 47, last line : — on both sides, 
p. 64 : — of everybody, p. 69 : — 
ill of the, p. 70 : — rubbish, p. 
93, and vide Chatter. 

Talked of, much, p. 14: p. 27. 

Talking, much, p. 66 : weary with 
— ,p. 82,11. 1,3 and 8. 

Tall, be, p. 3, 1. 4 : very — , p. 6. 

Tapering, p. 67. 

Task, easy, p. 6 : weary — , p. 11 : 
perform a — , p. 78. 

Taste, lose one*s, p. 42. 

Tawdriness, p. 49. 

Teach your grandmother, p. 38. 

Tears, restrain, p. 3: crocodile's 
— , p. 16. 



123 



Tediously, long, p. 42, 1. 5. 
Teeth, set on edge, p. 24 : gnash 
— in soger, p. 67 : grind the — -, 
p. 67. 
Terms, be on bad, pp. 16 and 17, 

1. 4. 
Terribte, devil of a, p. 7. 
Terror, of, p. 100 : vide Fear and 

Dread. 
Thanks (ironical), p. 37. 
Theft, petty, of servants, p. 2. 
Thiok-headed, p. 62: vide Block- 
head and Fool. 
Thief, vide Plagiarist: — skilled, 

p. 3. 
Thin, wasted, p. 27, 1. 26 : become 
— , pp. 38, 11. 26 and 28, and 65. 
Think lightly of, p. 66. 
Thirst, parched with, p. 31 :'* p. 

65 : — for blood, p. 78. 
Thorn, be in the side of, p. 4 : — 

in the side of, p. 25. 
Thorns, drag upon, p. 55, 1. 17 : 

plant — , p. 66, 1. 21. 
Thought, absorbed in, p. 47. 
Thriftless, p. 78, L 5. 
Throb, to, p. 79. 
Thronghout, vide Top to Toe. 
Thr sh in the mouth, p. 83. 
Tickling, vide Itch. 
Tie nuptial knot, p. 68. 
• Tied by the leg,' p. 9, IL 2 and 3. 
TifiE, a, p. 91 : vide Quarrel. 
Tight place, get out of, p. 10. 
Time, server, p. 12 : have a good 
— , p. 81 : give a bad — , p. 87: 
— serving, p. 93, L 26 : every — , 
p. 97 : to change — , p. 99, U. 6 
and '7. 
Times, changed for the better, p. 
26 : — dhanged, p. 68, IL 19 and 
21 and p. 98 : hard ->, p. 93, 1. 
21. 
Timid, p. 67. [16. 

Tire oneself by teaching, p. 36, 1. 
Tit for tat, pp. 13 and 17. 
Toil, to, p. 78. 

Tongue, fails, p. 30 : guard the — , 
p. 30, 11. 22 and 24 : not to move 
— , p. 31 : to padlock the — , p. 
83: on the tip of — , p. 91, 1. 
19 and p. 93. 
Toothless, p. 96. 
Top to toe, p. 90. 
Topics, unpleasant, p. 89, U. 8 and 

14. 
Touch, of delicate, p. 33 : to — , 
p. 96 : p. 96. 



Trace, leaving no, p. 43. 

Track, beaten, p. 77, 11. 11 and 14. 

Trade, briskness of, jp, 69. 

Trader, p. 6 \ 

Trail of snake, beat, p. 77. 

Transport, to, p. 63. 

Transportation, p. 63. 

Trap m ambush, p. 73, 1. 10. 

Trash, p. 96. 

Travelled, p. 73. 

Treacherous, p. 64, 1. 23 : — con- 
fidant, p. 74. 

Treachery, p. 36, 1. 10 : curse for 
— , p. 90. 

' Treasure,' a, p. 81, 1. 2^ 

Treat, lightly, p. 6: — roughly, 
p. >9 : give a — , p. 84. 

Trick, of fortune, p. 61, 1. 4: p. 
96: vuie Artifice. 

Tricks, forget one's, p. 20. 

Trifle, fuss about, p. 3, 1. 1 : — 
from wreck, p. 7 : think a — , p. 
66. 

Trouble, get one into, p. 32, L 13 : 
in — , p. 93. 

Try, hard, p. 36: — an impossibi- 
lity, p. »0. 

Tumble, (acrobatic), p. 52 : to — 
(in flight), p. 6 K 

Tumult, cause, p. 62. 

Turn away resrard from, p. 4 : — 
out of house and home, p. 73: 
— away, p. 74, 11. 9 and 12. 

Twilight, p. 83. 

Twist and turn, p. 100. 

Tyrannize over, p. 68. 

Tyrant, tied to a, p. 60. 

U 

Unacquainted with, p. 93 : vide 

Ignorant of. 
Unadorned, p. 91. 
Unanimoas, p. 6. 
Uncontrolled, p. 40. 
Uncouth, p. 62. 
Undertake a mission, p. 8. 
Undervalue, to, p. 80, 11. 18 to 22. 
Undeserving and lucky, p. 51 , 1. 8. 
Undone, be, ruined, p. 13. 
Unequalled, p. 81, 1. 2>: vide 

Matchless. 
Unfortunate, become, p. 13, U. 26 

and 26. 
Unfriendly to, p. 26, 1. 3. 
Ungrateful , p. 80. 
Uninjured, p. 90, 1. 14. 
Universe, the, p. 45. 



124 



Unluoky, p. 7» 1. 1 : p. 33, 1. 9 : 

—, (born ?), p. 39, 1. 6 : p. 89. 
Unmarried, p. 73, 1. 20. 
Unpleasant, to be, p. 68, 11. 18 and 

20. 
Unstable, to be, p. 9. 
Untimely, do something, p. 8, 1. 

30 : — precautionary measures, 

p. 9, 1. 22 : — death, p. 85 and 

vide Death. 
Untrustworthy, p. 30, 1. 29. 
Upbraid, pp. 30, 34 and 85. 
Uproar, p. 47, 1. 21. 
Ups and downs of life, p. 36 : p. 

69, 11. 7 and 9 : p. 88. 
Upset things, confusion, p. 32 : — , 

of heart, p. 60. 
Use fists or weapon, p. 95. 
Useful, to be, p. 54. 
Useless, p. 59, 1. 7 : p. 59. 
Utter, to, p. 83. 



Vagrant, p. 68. 

Vaguely, p. 72. 

Vain, make, p. 9 : — imaginings, 
p. 23. 

Valueless, p. 62. 

Vanish (of boasting, pride, enjoy- 
ment, intoxication), p. 41, 1. 13, 
and p. 58, 1. 18. 

Vein in nose, p. 90. 

Venomous words, p. 32. 

Versatile, p. 97. 

Vexation, slight, p. 46. 

ViUfy, p. 88. 

Violence, show, p. 67. 

Virile, p. 61. 

ViriUty, lack of , p 61. 

Vision of past, p. 23. 

Visitor, hasty, p. 6 : remiss — , p. 
46, 1. 13. 

Voice, lose one's, p. 70: shout at 
the top of — , p. 70. 

Volunteer, p. 8, 1. 24. 

W 

Wait a bit, p. 27. 

Walk, go at a, p. 50: — slowly, 

p. 71. 
Wander about aimlessly, p. 21, 11. 

18, 22 and 25 : — miserably, p. 

27 : — at will, p. 65 : — idly or 

in distress, p. 79. 
Wanderer, p. 22. 
Warning, Shi* ah, p. 85 



Wash, ) clothes back from the, 
Washing, f p. 65. 
Wasp*8 nest, stir up, p. 7. 
Waste, wealth, p. 5 : — , destroy, 

p. 23, 1. 1 : pp. 37 and 46. 
Wasted, of money, p 15 : be — , 

etc., p. 22, 1. 2: — from sick- 
ness, p. 27, 1. 26. 
* Watch,' to, p. 31,1. 20. 
Water, deprive of, p. 58 : to — (of 

the mouth), p. 84. 
Water^€tfrier*8 sovereignity, p. 37. 
Ways, go one's, p. 27. 
Weak, to feel, p. 17: —, easily led, 

p. 85: — minded, p. 85. 
Wealth, waste to, p. 6. 
Wealthy, p. 67. 
Weapon, to use, p. 95. 
Wear one out, p. 25. 
Weary, of one's life, p. 16: — 

one's brain (by talking), p. 25: 

— by talk, p. 35: — one's 

brcun, p. 36: — with talking, p. 

82, 11. 1-3 and 8. 
Wearisome business, p. 36. 
Weave ropes of sand, p. 90. 
Weep, bitterly, to, pp. 1; 11, 1. 

28; and 15 : — copiously, p. 3 : — 

crocodile's tears, p. 15: — in 

anguish, p. 23. 
Weeping, burst out, p. 11, 1 26. 
Weevil and wheat, p. 75. 
Welcome, p. 34 : to — , p. 96. 
Well-to-do, p. 24: — and good, 

p. 48 : — off, p. 94 : — wisher, 

p. 99 : — . ventilated, p. 99. 
Whatever it may be, p. 58. 
Wheat-coloured, p. 71. 
Wheedle, p. 25 : to — , p. 77. 
Whimper, p. 100. 
Whisper together, p. 55. 
White, elephant, get rid of, p. 7, 

1. 18: — and yellow, p. 71'. 
Whited sepulchre, p. 7, 1. 6 and p. 

43. 
Whoever he may be, p. 59. 
Whole, the, p. 33. 
Wicked woman, p. 42. 
Widow, become a, p. 80. 
Wife, take a, p. 74, 1. 13 : a — , p. 

74,1. 16: p. 74,1. 19. 
Wigs on the green, p. 91, 1. 5. 
Wild p. 40. 

WiUinglV, p. 34, 11. 22 and 23. 
Wind, something in the, p. 24 : — 

out of evils, p. 48, 1. 2 : swift as 

— , p. 99, 1. 10. 
Wisdom, learn from one's mistakes 



125 



or misdeeds, p. 1 : — curses you, 
p. 45, last line : pretender to — , 

E. 46 : (look to your) — , p. 46, 
I. 
WisdomlesSy and old, p. 26, 1. 24: 

p. 45, last line. 
• Wise,' p. 45, 1. 16. 
Wits, lose one's, p. 34, 11. 12 and 
13: — wandered, p. 45 : lose the 
— , pp. 45, 1. 6, and 82, 1. 4 : use 
your — , p. 46, I. 29: deprive 
out of one's — , p. 99, 1. 30 : be 
out of one's — , p. 99, U. 31 and 
32 : vide Mad, Cracked, etc. 

Wolf in sheep's clothing, pp. 7, 1. 
5; 8,1. 5; 15; 41 ; and 85. 

Woman, cunning, p. 3 : wicked — , 
p. 42. 

Wonder, to happen, p. 70, 11. 6 and 
13. 

Wonderful, do something, p. 61. 

Wordy not to speak a, p. 31 : pass 
one's — , p. 31 : in a — , p. 38: 
true to his — , p. 52 : ' give me 
a ' — , p. 77. 

Words, harsh, suffer patiently, p. 
6 : richer in — , no performance, 
p. 6: bitter — , pp. 16 and 17: 
— to be accepted, p. 58 : make 
light of — , pp. 72 and 99: 
string of — , p. 76; — put into 
mouth of, p. 77 : poisonous — , 
p. 77, 1. 3f sweet — , p. 77, L 3: 
enticing — , pp. 78 and 90 : — , 
take out of one's mouth, p. 84; 
eat one's — , p. 84 : to have — , 
p. 91. 1. 15 : vide Quarrel. 

Wordly matters, no concern with, 
p. 22. 

Worms, eaten by, p. 67, 1. 8. 

Worn out, old man, p. 33 : p. 94. 

Worried, to be, pp. 25 and* 87: — 
to death, p. 43, IL 28 and 30, 
and p. 76 : — by, p. 88, L 21. 

Worry a person, p. 9, U. 12 and 21 
and p. 49 : — , harass, p. 20, 1. 



7 : — constantly, p. 36 : — by 
talking, p. 37: — another, p. 
87. 

Worse, all the, p. 91. 

Worship a person, p. 6 : — devo- 
tedly, p. 10. 

Worthless, p. 62, U. 27, 28 and 30: 
to be — , pp. 68 and 80: — 
thing, p. 81. 

Wound, sprinkle salt on, pp. 16 
and 57 : — the feelings, p. 86 : 
to break out — , p. 97. 

Wounds, to dress, p. 81. 

Wrangle, p. 14. 

Wrangling of common people, p. 
57. 

Wrath, suppress one's, p. 32. 

Wreck, rescue trifle from a, p. 7. 

Wrestlers, be entwined, p. 68. 

Wretched from money-making, p. 
90. 

Write off-hand, p. 52. 

Writing, crabbed, p. 19 : omission 
in — , p. 52 : conmiit to — , p. 
52 : bad ^, p. 67 : vide Quill- 
driving. 

Wrong, something, p. 24 : entirely 
— , p. 47. 

Wry face, p. 83. 



Year, whole, p. 32. 

Yearly, p. 32. 

Years, long, p. 32. 

Yellow and white, p. 71. 

Yes, p. 35, 1. 16 : to say — , p. 96 : 

to say — or no, p. 97. 
Young head, old shoulders, p. 12. 
Youth (reminder to), p. 26 : — 

(contemp.), p. 84. 



Zeal, show too late, p. 6. 



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